REVIEW: ‘Time Lord Victorious,’ Issue #2

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Doctor Who: Time Lord Victorious #2

Doctor Who: Time Lord Victorious #2 is the second part of a Titan Comics limited series, based on the BBC character. The writer is Jody Houser with Roberta Ingranata on art. Colors are by Enrica Eren Angiolini and the letterer is Richard Starkings of Comicraft. The last issue saw The Doctor Who trapped in a paradox universe and captured by the Daleks, his greatest enemies. The Daleks surprisingly enlisted the help of their nemesis to save Skaro, under threat by a species called the Hond. On the planet’s surface, the Doctor is aided by a battle-damaged Dalek Prime Strategist, preparing for the fight ahead. When entering a secure area, he is confronted by one of the Hond…

Issue 2 features the conclusion of the interaction between the Time Lord, Dalek, and Hond. The Doctor tries to reason with the new alien, as he is often want to do, however, the Dalek blasts the Hond to pieces, as it is always want to do. The two make their way to the center of the building, discussing their plans and differences before the Dalek is attacked by a vengeful, furious Hond. Can the Doctor save the Daleks, himself, and the planet itself?

The second half of the story moves at the same pace as the last one, following the Doctor and his metal companion into the heart of Skaro. There is more intensity, as the Hond is getting closer to the planet. At the same time, the mystery of the Prime Strategist is explained further. The excitement is palpable when the Hond attacks, forcing the Doctor to act. The way that the ends clarify and wrap up the paradox was very surprising. Who the Hond is and how the Doctor was not expected.

While the plot was effective, it was slightly disappointing at how the team-up between Time Lord and Dalek ended. The discussions the Prime Strategist had with the Doctor were enjoyable and tapped into an animosity 50 years of real history and centuries in canonical history in the making. But there aren’t enough Daleks in Doctor Who: Time Lord Victorious #2, nor is there enough Skaro. Which is odd, because the story takes place on it. Had the series been longer, there may have been more to explore.

The dialogue between the Doctor and the Dalek is clever by Houser. Only having an emotionless domed creature as the only other figure for the Doctor to converse with means that the Time Lord often takes the short answers given back to him and expands on them himself. The Dalek sense of humor, completely serious yet witty nonetheless, may elicit smiles from the reader. The menacing monster being reliant on the Doctor creates an interesting dynamic when the action scenes unfold, and seeing it scream for the Doctor’s aid is a striking image on the page. The letters by Starking showcases the panic the Dalek feels, for the first time looking frantic as the font gets increasingly bigger.

The Tenth Doctor is reaching his most arrogant peak in this comic, gloating and highly aware of how powerful he is. The Dalek next to him is manipulative in every sentence, always wanting to be superior itself. 

The art remains to be beautiful. The detail is exquisite on both aliens, even more so on the Dalek this issue. The damage it has picked upsets it apart from the perfection within the armors of the rest of the race. When the Hond attacks it, the creature within the casing is hinted at through the crack in the Dalekanium. In the singular eye, there seems to be a glimpse of fear.

The Hond are gloopy, almost formless, beings of sludge. For context, they look like Muk or Grimer from Pokémon. The reasoning for this is made clear and understandable, and Ingranata etches emotion on their large faces beautifully. But the design doesn’t necessarily warrant the terror they have imposed on the Daleks, masters of fear themselves. The facial expressions plastered on the Doctor’s face are both fun and impressive. The trademark scrunching of his face as he gets confused is replicated perfectly.

The colors are again stunning. The majority of the issue encases the Doctor and his sidekick in dull greys, but this later transforms into gorgeous blues, before evolving further into a wonderful purple that bathes the panels. The colors on the Doctor’s suit are eye-catching and accurately look at how they would under different hues of light. 

Doctor Who: Time Lord Victorious #2 is an ending that doesn’t quite fulfill the potential that the first issue started. The art team is talented, but it was disappointing to not explore more of the Dalek homeland. Two of the most famous nemeses in fiction being forced to join forces isn’t as exciting on the page as it should be. Houser has the personality of the Tenth Doctor nailed down; especially as the Time Lord Victorious, and it is fun reading any comic with him in. But it’s unfortunate the small series wasn’t given more images to get more out of a terrific idea. 

Doctor Who: Time Lord Victorious #2 is available where comics are sold.

'Time Lord Victorious,' Issue #2
3.5

TL;DR

Doctor Who: Time Lord Victorious #2 is an ending that doesn’t quite fulfill the potential that the first issue started. The art team is talented, but it was disappointing to not explore more of the Dalek homeland. Two of the most famous nemeses in fiction being forced to join forces isn’t as exciting on the page as it should be. Houser has the personality of the Tenth Doctor nailed down; especially as the Time Lord Victorious, and it is fun reading any comic with him in. But it’s unfortunate the small series wasn’t given more images to get more out of a terrific idea.