REVIEW: ‘The Amazing Spider-Man: The Sins of Norman Osborn,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The Amazing Spider-Man: The Sins of Norman Osborn

The Amazing Spider-Man: The Sins of Norman Osborn #1 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Nick Spencer, art by Federico Vicentini, colors by Edgar Delgado, and letters by Joe Caramagna. The Sin Eater is targeting villains, and his next shot is aimed right for Spider-Man’s deadliest foe, Norman Osborn. But while many believe Sin Eater is helping New York, Spider-Man doesn’t trust him. So he’s taking it upon himself to save his old nemesis. Meanwhile, some other spiders are spinning a web and making a fateful decision.

One of the first Spider-Man stories I ever read saw Peter and Osborn trapped in a damaged elevator after an attack by the Kingpin. Despite the possibility of his secret being revealed, Peter uses his powers to save everyone in the trapped elevator, including Osborn. To this day the story is one of my favorites. It defines, for me, who Peter is and how far he’ll go to do the right thing. The Amazing Spider-Man: The Sins of Norman Osborn #1 delivers another story in a noticeably similar vein. and once again, against his own interest, Peter shows who he truly is, and what makes him so special.

Even though this story is far from the first time our hero has had to save those who have tried to harm him, it is not an easy thing to do. Writer Spencer delivers Peter’s dialogue with just a bit of edge to it. Peter feels like he is trying desperately to be himself. To be the puny hero. But you can feel like he is a hair width from snapping. The strain he is feeling, amplified by Osborn’s unwillingness to cooperate, is getting to him. And as for Osborn himself, Spencer delivers the classic villain in all his antagonistic glory.

The rest of The Amazing Spider-Man: The Sins of Norman Osborn #1 focuses on a meeting taking place of various heroes who wear the Spider. They have gathered to address what Peter is doing, and whether or not they should intervene. Their concerns are not entirely clear to me, as these issues seem to steam from previous stories I haven’t read. So, if you are not up on the latest Spider-Man shenanigans you should go into this issue prepared for a bit of confusion. Aside from this point, these scenes are handled well. The unease many of them feel at the thought of taking action that is directly opposed to Peter’s is palpable.

The art by Vicentini delivers both the action and emotion of its story. From the discomfort within the secret meeting to Spider-Man’s frustration at having to save his enemy again, everything lands with a bang. This bang is further emphasized through the color usage of Delgado. The excellent contrasts used complete the art’s presentation, making many panels pop off the page. Finally, we have Caramagna’s lettering, which delivers the story splendidly. From the dialogue to the various sound effects, everything is delivered in a crisp and clear manner.

So, to summarize, The Amazing Spider-Man: The Sins of Norman Osborn #1 delivers an exciting, and emotional story, that comes with a bit of baggage. While it’s still thoroughly enjoyable without all the details, there are story points that might not fully land if you aren’t up on all things Spider-Man.

The Amazing Spider-Man: The Sins of Norman Osborn #1 is available on September 15th wherever comics are sold.

The Amazing Spider-Man: The Sins of Norman Osborn #1
4.5

TL;DR

So, to summarize, The Amazing Spider-Man: The Sins of Norman Osborn #1 delivers an exciting, and emotional story, that comes with a bit of baggage. While it’s still thoroughly enjoyable without all the details, there are story points that might not fully land if you aren’t up on all things Spider-Man.