REVIEW: ‘Catwoman,’ Issue #25

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Catwoman #25
Catwoman #25 is published by DC Comics, written by Ram V, art by Fernando Blanco, colors by FCO Plascencia, and letters by Tom Napolitano. Having chosen their mark, Selina, Cobblepot, and Nygma make a grab for a huge score at the Underbroker’s expense. But are these three truly birds of a feather in this felony? Or will the cat walk away with the canary…

What do you call a comic story that could’ve been a simple heist, but thanks to a masterful sense of the dramatic is made much more? Give up? Catwoman #25 of course! Ok, I promise, that’s the only riddle. Seriously though, I was taken completely by surprise with the amount of style this issue exudes.

Interspersed throughout the story are moments were the comic presents us with how Selina is internalizing her job. Presented in a gorgeous painted style that utilizes coloring that harkens to an aged photo, we see Selina dancing with a tiger. Her outfit in these moments harkens to her oft-forgotten Latina heritage and the emotion present in not only her face but in the presentation of her whole being is masterful on the part of artist Blanco. These moments transform what would’ve been a fun heist into something with a more classic feel. A bit of introspection into Selina herself. An amazing surprise to elevate this book.

Catwoman #25 
I’m at a loss for which of these two is exuding more power here.

Beyond these moments, Catwoman #25 delivers an enjoyable heist that otherwise proceeds basically as one would expect. Ram V delivers a script that utilizes each of Batman’s iconic rouges featured here wonderfully. From Nygma’s playful riddling to Cobblepot’s orneriness, each character feels right. And of course, at the heart of the story is all the style, class, and confidence one would expect to get when Selina is in her element.

The art in Catwoman #25, even beyond the aforementioned praise, provides a skillful presentation. I particularly appreciate how Blanco puts the viewer right up close to many of the characters in moments. Frustration and anger are always best delivered when it feels all-encompassing in an image. Blanco delivers this beautifully.  Combine this with his ability to reinforce that suave attitude delivered in Ram’s writing of Selina and the delivery of these characters is complete.

This focus on emotion by Blanco is complemented nicely by Plascencia’s colors. Particularly with how the colorwork does a great job enhancing the ambient light playing on characters. Monitors give off a strong green color, making the maniacal laughter of Riddler even more on point. These sorts of touches work great to both enhance the emotion, as well as reinforce that these characters are in a physical place.

Often comic art doesn’t allow the character and the surroundings to feel interconnected properly. Almost giving the subjects the feeling of being in front of a green screen. Here Plascencia wraps the subjects in their world. Finishing the art’s presentation wonderfully.

And lastly, we see a solid delivery in the letter work on the part of Napolitano. With all the dialogue bubbles placed well, and a great sense of design for the sound effects, the lettering gets to be both clear, and interesting throughout the story.

When all is said and done Catwoman #25 exceeded all my expectations. It took what could’ve been just another heist and makes it a bit more memorable. Given the number of heists readers have seen Selina make, this is sure to be an appreciated thing.

Catwoman #25 is available on September 15th wherever comics are sold.

Catwoman #25
4.5

TL;DR

When all is said and done Catwoman #25 exceeded all my expectations. It took what could’ve been just another heist and makes it a bit more memorable. Given the number of heists readers have seen Selina make, this is sure to be an appreciated thing.