REVIEW: ‘Fantastic Four Empyre: Fallout,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Fantastic Four Empyre: Fallout #1

Fantastic Four Empyre: Fallout #1 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Dan Slott, art by Sean Izaakse, colors by Marcia Menyz and letters by Joe Caramagna. With the war against the Cotati won, it comes time to settle the peace. There are questions about the Cotati’s technology that needs answering, along with a place to settle them where they can’t hurt anyone again. Plus, what to do with two particularly unique kids also needs figuring out…

It always makes me chuckle a little, when I read a story like Fantastic Four Empyre: Fallout #1. How quickly and easily an intergalactic conflict can be tied up in a neat little bow. Oh, I understand the reasoning. Long drawn out peace negotiations are not exciting to read. Yet still, it has been often shown that crafting a peace can be just as hard as waging the war.

Those who were allied against a common foe can quickly find themselves at opposite ends of a bargaining table. That Earth has no demands for being dropped into another intergalactic war they didn’t make, or that the Kree/Skrull Alliance harbors no ill will for the Earth’s momentary opposition which prevented them from stopping the Cotati before they got going feels wrong. For the last couple decades the comic book medium has, on occasion, been more willing to show the lasting effects of the conflicts that touch the worlds they exist in. That was part of what made the Civil War story arc so impactful. But, that it seems is not for today.

To be fair, the cleanness with which Fantastic Four Empyre: Fallout #1 arrives at it’s various conclusions is really my only complaint. Slott pens a tale that has a fair mix of humor, heartfelt tenderness, some ingenious solutions, even if they are arrived at a bit too smoothly.

While many characters get to have their moment here, the best part of this story belongs to the Thing and Alicia Masters. I won’t say why, but I will say their moment here is a thing of beauty. It is handled in a way that feels genuine and, follows one of the best little twist moments I’ve seen pulled in a while.

The art work in Fantastic Four Empyre: Fallout #1 does a solid job of delivering a rather character filled story. There are a lot of panels here that are nearly bursting with characters. And the vast majority of them are not simple extras that could be slipped into the background without too much fuss. Most everyone here is an icon. Yet, Izaakse does a great job of not missing a beat with any of them. Every Avenger and Fantastic Four member looks as they should. Not a light task to give all those characters their due every time.

Furthering the the art work is an equally solid color job from Menyz. There is a broad spectrum of colors employed here, and they all work well together. With many panels backgrounds being left to pure color, Menyz does a great job of choosing ones that will highlight, but not clash with, the subjects within them.

Rounding out the presentation in Fantastic Four Empyre: Fallout #1 is Caramagna’s letters. Given the nature of this story it isn’t a surprise that there are a number of extremely heavy dialogue moments within it. Caramagna does a commendable job of keeping it all straight. Furthermore, the words not only stay out of the art’s way, but always feels like it is balancing it out. Becoming a part of the the art, instead of a separate element. An impressive feat for sure.

When all is said and done, Fantastic Four Empyre: Fallout #1 wraps up the Empyre storyline in a nice clean bow. With some humor, and a fair measure of heart, Slott and company send off Marvel’s latest company crossover on a truly feel good note.

Fantastic Four Empyre: Fallout #1 is available September 9th wherever comics are sold.

 


Fantastic Four Empyre: Fallout #1
4.5

TL;DR

When all is said and done, Fantastic Four Empyre: Fallout #1 wraps up the Empyre storyline in a nice clean bow. With some humor, and a fair measure of heart, Slott and company send off Marvel’s latest company crossover on a truly feel good note.