REVIEW: ‘Killadelphia’, Issue #7

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Killadelphia #7 is written by Rodney Barnes, illustrated by Jason Shawn Alexander, colored by Luis NCT and lettered by Marshall Dillon. It is published by Image Comics. This issue begins a new story arc, “Burn Baby Burn”; it picks up after the events of the first volume. Detective James Sangster Jr struggles with the loss of his father, as well as the fact that vampires now walk among the living. Elsewhere, Abigail Adams assumes control of the vampire hordes, unleashing a monstrous vampire named Jupiter.

The first story arc expertly mixed horror and history, and that continues here. Abigail was hinted to be an even bigger monster than her husband John, and we get to see HOW big of a monster she is. We also see the history of Jupiter; he was a former slave turned vampire, and unlike his vampire brethren, he is supremely vicious. Alexander and NCT paint this horror in a single page: Jupiter tears through several bodies, his body coated in blood and face twisted in a vicious grimace. Also adding to the horror is the muzzle he wears; only his glowing eyes are visible through the iron.

Alexander and NCT don’t miss an opportunity to unleash gore on the pages. Alexander draws heads being ripped off their bodies, as well as bodies themselves being torn in half. The final page of the issue is pure nightmare fuel and I mean that as a compliment. Alexander’s surreal, shadowy images mix perfectly with the splashes of red that NCT uses to signify blood.

Barnes’ script also delves deep into the uneasiness and terror that Sangster is feeling. He talks about nightmares that he’s had ever since his father’s death. He admits to being out of his depth with the vampire invasion. It’s great to see a male character–especially a Black male character–share his feelings and admit he doesn’t have all the answers. Not every hero in a story has to have all the skills or know all the answers and I’m glad Barnes is willing to shake things up. We also get to see how the world has changed in the wake of vampirism; medical examiners keep stakes in their closets and crime scenes are subject to even more scrutiny.

Barnes, Alexander, and Dillon also provide a backup story for the issue titled “Elysium Garden”. Taking place in April 1962, it introduces an entirely new supernatural creature to the proceedings. It also plays out like an old school horror film; from the black and white palette to the unexpected twist at the end. Clearly the creative team is more than willing to tackle other monsters as this series progresses.

Killadelphia #7 starts a new story drenched in the same blood, horror, and history that propelled the first volume. With every issue, the creative team continues to show why this series will stand among the great horror comics. I’m definitely interested to see where this goes, especially with the backup story introducing a new element of horror to this universe.

Killadelphia #7 is available wherever comics are sold now.

Killadelphia #7
5

TL;DR

Killadelphia #7 starts a new story drenched in the same blood, horror, and history that propelled the first volume. With every issue, the creative team continues to show why this series will stand among the great horror comics. I’m definitely interested to see where this goes, especially with the backup story introducing a new element of horror to this universe.