REVIEW: ‘Mega Man: Fully Charged,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Mega Man Fully Charged #1 - But Why Tho

Mega Man: Fully Charged #1 is published by BOOM! Studios. It comes from the creative team of writers A.J. Marchisello and Marcus Rinehart, illustrator Stefano Simeone, colorist Igor Monti, and letterer Ed Dukeshire. The first issue begins with a narration from our protagonist Mega Man. He explains how his home, Silicon City, was attacked by a group known as the Robot Masters. Though the city almost fell, it was saved by the efforts of Mega Man and others.

The perspective then shifts to Mega Man’s father, Dr. Light, as he heads to a negotiation. Soon it is revealed that his negotiations are being held with the rogue Robot Master Skull Man. The negotiations quickly turn sour and Dr. Light finds himself at Skull Man’s mercy. Fortunately, Dr. Light came prepared, and soon Mega Man is on the scene ready to rescue him. But there is more to Skull Man’s plans than meets the eye, and a great danger seems to be on the horizon for our heroes.

I’ve been a fan of Mega Man since my age was in the single digits. I’ve played every generation of his games and can trace my interest in the medium back to a love of the Blue Bomber. Thankfully, Marchisello and Rinehart’s script for Mega Man: Fully Charged #1 does him justice while also helping to contextualize his exploits. The story is simultaneously grounded and melodramatic. There are a few times when it feels a little silly, especially if you imagine reading it as someone unfamiliar with the character. However, for anyone who grew up with Mega Man, a more mature take on him is something that is surprisingly effective. Taking the Robot Masters from rampaging machines and making them terrorists sounds bleak on paper, but somehow it works.

Mega Man: Fully Charged #1

Simeone’s art, on the other hand, is a mixed bag. It is absolutely beautiful, but also seems off for a character like Mega Man. Every panel is clean and lovely to look at, but it never fully clicked for me that I was reading a comic about one of my favorite video game characters. When he finally shows up on the page his design is a little too lanky. However, the illustrations feature some absolutely gorgeous and awesome panels. Particularly the fight scene around the mid-point of the comic.

This is all bolstered by Monti’s colors. One of my personal favorite aspects is the use of the color blue, particularly the way that it ebbs and flows between places that Mega Man is in power and where he isn’t. Finally, the letters from Dukeshire are excellent, especially his SFX which is evocative and a blast to look at.

Overall I liked Mega Man: Fully Charged #1, though it didn’t grab me as much as I’d hoped it would. The story is a solid way to make the character more mature, though it isn’t terribly accessible for newcomers to the character. The art is stylish and lovely to look at but feels like kind of a bad fit for Mega Man himself. Regardless I give this comic a recommendation to anyone who loves Mega Man or wants some solid sci-fi action.

Mega Man: Fully Charged #1 is available now wherever comic books are sold.

Mega Man: Fully Charged #1
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TL;DR

Overall I liked Mega Man: Fully Charged #1, though it didn’t grab me as much as I’d hoped it would. The story is a solid way to make the character more mature, though it isn’t terribly accessible for newcomers to the character.