REVIEW: ‘Hellions,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Hellions #3

Hellions #3 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Zeb Wells, with art by Stephan Segovia, colors by David Curiel, and letters by Ariana Maher. Things have gone from bad to worse for the newly minted team.  With several members captured, while others are locked in combat with each other, the situation seems to be as bad as it could get. But, when an untested team finds itself up against the perpetrators of the infamous Mutant Massacre and the clone of Jean Grey, Madelyne Pryor, what else could one really expect?

Hellions #3 focuses its story around two of the comic book mediums’ most identifiable traits. One is good, the other, well, maybe not bad, but certainly, a hurdle for the genre to deal with.

The good one is the fan-favorite villain monologue. Much of this issue revolves around Pryor delivering every detail of her sinister machinations like she was a classically trained Shakespearean actor. Wells’s writing makes this work perfectly. However, it is in this monologue that we come across Hellions #3 biggest stumbling block. It deals a lot with Pryor’s original dealings with the team.

Within the story there are loads of references to events within the X-Men continuity that lands squarely in the ’80s. The birth of Cable, Scott’s abandoning of Pryor for Jean, and Pryor’s subsequent fall into madness during the Inferno storyline are all referenced heavily here. If one happens to not be familiar with all these decades-old references you might find yourself a little lost as to what is going on.

The other major plot point in Hellions #3 centers around Psylocke’s efforts to subdue Wildchild so he can help her rescue the rest of the team. These moments of combat are handled well. Psylocke’s skill and brutality come across nicely thanks to Segovia’s art.

Speaking of art, Hellions #3 delivers a phenomenal visual presentation. Along with the above praise, Segovia does an all-around excellent job with this issue. Large panels and up-close views keep the reader feeling in the thick of the story. My only real wish from the visuals would’ve been an update to Madelyne’s outfit. The whole Goblin Queen look has definitely gone long past it’s prime. Would’ve been nice to see her change into something new.

And while Segovia’s lines are great, one has to praise Curiel’s colors with equal enthusiasm. There are some absolutely wonderful lighting moments in Hellions #3 that make the panels pop. Of particular note is a panel involving the Psylocke trade markets psychic knife. How Curiel bathes the panel in purple light is perfection.

Lastly is Maher’s letters. The job done by Maher here is technically proficient, but I would’ve liked to have seen a little more flair in some of the dialogue boxes. This is particularly true for Pryor. As previously noted, the character dives into some pretty mad ranting moments. I would’ve liked to have seen the dialogue’s presentation in these moments really double down to emphasize Pryor’s tone. As it is, the lettering does everything it needs to for its primary job of delivering the story in a clear way.

When all is said and done Hellions #3 continues its story well. Aside from some potentially hard to follow references for new readers the story is interesting and sets up its next installment well.

Hellions #3 is available on August 26th wherever comics are sold.

Hellions #3
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TL;DR

When all is said and done Hellions #3 continues its story well. Aside from some potentially hard to follow references for new readers the story is interesting and sets up its next installment well.