REVIEW: ‘Legion of Super-Heroes,’ Issue #8

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Legion of super-heroes #8

Legion of Super-Heroes #8 is published by DC Comics, written by Brian Michael Bendis, art by Evan “Doc” Shaner, Jeff Lemire, Dustin Nguyen, Joëlle Jones, Michael Avon Deming, Liam Sharp, André Lima Araújo, Sanford Greene, Cully Hamner, Vanick Paquette, Dan Hipp, David Mack, Darick Robertson, Dan Jurgens, Norm Rapmuno, Bilquis Evely, Fabio Moon, Michael Allred, Ryan Sook, Wade von Grawbadger, Alex Maleev, John Timms and Duncan Rouleau, colors by Jordie Bellaire and letters by Dave Sharpe. With Crav, Leader of Rimbor knocking on the Legion’s door, newly minted leader Ultra Boy decides the best course of action is to meet this challenge head-on. Predictably enough, a battle ensues.

Legion of Super-Heroes #8’s story is delivered through the eyes of Legionarie Chameleon Boy as he recounts the events to his mother, the Madam Honor President of the United Planets. The usage of this point of view comes with both strengths and weaknesses. The strengths of this come with the introduction of several previously unmentioned Legion members. As each one comes into the story Chameleon Boy provides a natural way to let the reader in on what abilities these new Legion members possess. Instead of putting the information in generic explanation boxes. The weakness with pinning Legion of Super-Heroes #8’s narrative to the previously mentioned conversation is that Bendis repeatedly slows down the story as he bounces between the two characters in the present, and the story being told. This creates a torn feeling for me with whether or not this approach was the best way to go.

Legion of Super-Heroes #8

The battle itself provides an entertaining core narrative for the issue. We get to see a plethora of both powers and personalities as Bendis utilizes the impressive size of the Legion to keep every page devoted to the fight unique from all the others.

Outside of the battle itself, we also see Rose Forrest once more step out of the shadows as the Legion’s liaison to the United Planets government. Rose’s moments have been few and far between within the pages of Legion of Super-Heroes, much to my frustration. Bendis did such a wonderful job bringing Rose to the Legion era in the Legion of Super-Heroes: Millennium limited series it saddens me that she’s been left on the vine to wither since. But, with some information becoming more common knowledge concerning her history perhaps this is where Bendis will start to utilize her a bit better.

The art for Legion of Super-Heroes #8 is a cornucopia of styles as every single page’s art is provided by a different artist.  With 24 different artistic styles present the odds of all of them landing are slim. Nevertheless, there are some truly exceptional pieces of art to be found in this book. The single best example of the art present here has to be a full-sized image of Saturn Girl provided by Jurgens and Rapmuno. This page is presented in a gorgeous watercolor style that is the singular highlight of this entire book.

The letter work in Legion of Super-Heroes #8  has a few stumbling points in its presentation. While nothing too egregious occurs, there are a few panels where the reading sequence for the various dialogue boxes isn’t as clear as it should’ve been.

All in all, Legion of Super-Heroes #8 provides a solid narrative coupled with an interesting artistic delivery. Bendis and company continue to deliver a story that has just enough promise to keep me reading, though it never manages to really land as hard as I’d like it to.

Legion of Super-Heroes #8 is available now wherever comics are sold.

 

Legion of Super-Heroes #8
3.5

TL;DR

All in all, Legion of Super-Heroes #8 provides a solid narrative coupled with an interesting artistic delivery. Bendis and company continue to deliver a story that has just enough promise to keep me reading, though it never manages to really land as hard as I’d like it to.