REVIEW: ‘Captain Marvel,’ Issue #20

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Captain Marvel #20 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Kelly Thompson, with art by Cory Smith, inks by Adriano Di Benedetto, colors by Tamra Bonvillain, and letters by Clayton Cowles. Having successfully split the Kree Universal Weapon into four parts, and placed each of the other three into the hands of some of her most trusted allies, Carol is now ready to finish her investigation and bring the real criminal to justice.

One of the things I’ve always appreciated about Captain Marvel is how often she approaches problems from unique angles. Such angles as deciding that the best way to judge if the sacred alien weapon you’ve been gifted with is subtly manipulating you is to have your wizard friend magically break it into four pieces so you can keeping eye on it with you. only Carol would come up with a plan so out of left field. As someone who often sees problems, and subsequent solutions differently than many, I always appreciate the odd angled approach. Though not everyone it seems applauds Carol’s ingenuity…

As is generally the case throughout Thompson’s run on the book Captain Marvel #20 is filled with wonderful character moments. But perhaps the best to me is the exchange between Carol and poor Emperor Hulking. Considering the guy went from small-time superhero to intergalactic Emperor overnight, he’s keeping it together pretty well. But when he sees what Carol has done to the Universal Weapon, you can’t help but feel for the guy. Between Thompson’s writing and Smith’s excellent art, every panel of Hulking seems to scream,” This, I don’t need.” Heavy is the head that wears the crown. Or is that, heavy the head that names Carol Danvers Supreme Accuser?  One of the two.

Armed with the final pieces of the puzzle gained from Hulkling, Captain Marvel #20 heads back to the scene of the destroyed city for a confrontation with the perpetrator of the crime. The following battle does a great job of sharing the spotlight among all of the heroes present. With everything else, the issue covers the battle is short but sweet.

While all this is going on, the rest of Captain Marvel #20 keeps readers up on what Lauri-Ell is doing on earth. Once again Thompson utilizes the fish out of water scenario Lauri is in to create a wonderful moment of humor. The book ends with Lauri being asked to help an old friend of Carol’s. And this could be Trouble.

Captain Marvel #20’s art continues to impress. Handling the wide range of situations and emotions present in its narrative flawlessly. Smith is able to provide great performances, delivering on the presentation of each of the numerous characters in the story beautifully. Di Benedetto’s colors continue to augment Smith’s lines nicely. Some wonderful color contrasts are used to really make the characters stand out, even as the panels get busy during the action-heavy moments. Lastly, Cowles delivers an excellent lettering performance. His trademark clear dialog and some gorgeous sound effect writing combine to create the final touch on this visual package.

When all is said and done, Captain Marvel #20 delivers everything it sets out to. Humor, action, and heart are all rolled into one awesome package. Can’t wait for the next issue to see where the story will go from here.

Captain Marvel #20 is available on August 19th wherever comics are sold.

Captain Marvel #20
4.5

TL;DR

When all is said and done, Captain Marvel #20 delivers everything it sets out to. Humor, action and heart are all rolled into one awesome package. Can’t wait for next issue to see where the story will go from here.