REVIEW: ‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Willow,’ Issue #2

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Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Willow #2

BOOM! Studios‘ rebooting of the Buffyverse has continued with a solo-miniseries for everyone’s favorite witch: Willow.  Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Willow #2, is written by Mariko Tamaki, with art from Natcha Bustos, colors by Eleonora Bruni, and letters from Jodi Wyne. This limited series promises began last month with an issue focused on showcasing Willow’s struggles after the events of the Hellmouth event. The end of the world has really done a number on our heroine and we see her doing everything she can do to stay away from Sunnydale, even if she doesn’t know where she’s heading.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Willow #2 opens up with Willow waking up from a nightmare. Remembering she is in a different town, in a different bed, she starts her first day in Abhainn. She shops and she realizes that the town is just too quiet and not like anywhere else she’s visited. Populated by what appears to be only femme background characters, its clear to the reader that this is a magical place. While Willow seems oblivious at first, by the end of the issue, she knows exactly where she is, and it feels like home.

This issue is a stark contrast to the ominous ending of the last. While the other ended with the burning of a postcard that tied Willow to her friends and Sunnydale, seemingly trapping her, Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Willow #2 makes her stay in Abhainn seem to be just what she needs. With Bruni’s bright and whimsical palette making the happiness or at least a carefree town seems like just the place for Willow to find herself again. That said, for now, it is helping Willow thrive and so is the mysterious woman she met the last issue.

Tamaki’s writing is the star of this issue. Her strength of writing narration as well as dialogue creates an atmosphere of whimsy and curiosity. While we see Willow’s uncertainty in the new town, in the beginning, her excitement takes center stage. Tamaki’s ability to detail the story through narration and keep it feeling internal and personal to Willow is a skill that makes this limited series stand out. That was clear this issue and even more so in Willow #2, mainly because of how the dialogue flows seamlessly between the narration.

Bustos’ art is also great this issue and I’m continually impressed with their ability to show the variety of Willow’s emotions.  But the best piece of this issue’s art is the detail in the clothing, especially Willow’s new sweater. There is a wealth of amazing fashion in this issue that not only sets the tone for the town but creates a feminine atmosphere that makes you understand the tone of the town.

While there isn’t a lot that happens this issue, it’s easy to see between the opening and closing pages that Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Willow #2 is setting up for something big to happen. Plus, now that Willows has learned of Abhainn’s magic, the adventure is only beginning.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Willow #2 is available wherever comics are sold now.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Willow #2
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TL;DR

While there isn’t a lot that happens this issue, it’s easy to see between the opening and closing pages that Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Willow #2 is setting up for something big to happen. Plus, now that Willows has learned of Abhainn’s magic, the adventure is only beginning.