REVIEW: ‘Hawkman’, Issue #26

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Hawkman #26 cover art

Hawkman #26 is written by Robert Venditti. Fernando Pasarin returns to handle pencils. Oclair Albert and Wade Von Grawbadger continue to team up on inks for the series, Jeromy Cox provides colors and Rob Leigh inputs the word bubbles. Hawkman is published monthly by DC Comics and this issue brings to a close the confrontation with the Lord Beyond the Void, who the last issue easily trounced Hawkman and Hawkwoman.

Going all the way back to the first issue, current continuity painted the Lord of the Void as the beginning of Hawkman’s sordid existence. Then, Hawkman was Ktar Deathbringer, a winged centurion capturing aliens by the millions to toss into the Void as a sacrifice to the Lord. Things changed after Ktar encountered a redheaded woman who brought out his compassion, causing Ktar to rebel. The Lord went after him, Ktar imprisoned his fellow winged followers, and he and the redheaded woman, Shrra, began a nearly endless cycle of reincarnation, destined to find each other again and again.

After ages away from the Lord, who revealed the last issue that the Hawks falling into his realm was part of a carefully laid trap, one might presume the battle against him would last several issues. It would also be fair to reason great sacrifices must be made to either defeat or escape this godlike being who feeds off of souls. This would be asking a lot, considering Hawkman and Hawkwoman were reunited only a few issues ago.  Losing them now would be depressing and, from a narrative standpoint, self-defeating.

Hawkman #26 image panel

Hawkman #26 overall is excellent reading. I won’t tell how it ends. However, this issue offered great artwork with brief dialogue that fit the mood and narration. I was left loving it yet also wanted more from it. The Lord of the Void stands tall over the New 52 Hawk mythos, so his appearance should not be trivial by far. It wasn’t. Yet, I wanted it to be even more and believed it should have been, maybe two more issues to increase the tension. Yes, some of this was the result of waiting for this moment. The rest left me wanting. 

Resolution aside, the book soars. Opening the issue with Adam Strange and the Atom searching for the Hawks was a great opener. Venditti didn’t forget their role in the last story arc. Hopefully, they will play a role in the arc to come, as they don’t get a lot of exposure in DC books these days. Overall, Venditti did a fine job of moving the Hawks towards one another, and on to the next arc in their lives. He continued to make these two characters believable, human, and me as a fan eagerly awaiting what will happen to them next.

Pasarin gifts this issue with his exceptional penciling. Everything from grand fight scenes to the Hawks having a discussion is so well rendered, so detailed, and animate. The visual team of Albert, Von Grawbadger, Cox, and Leigh never cease to bring the goods; vividity of color, depth of inking, and standout lettering to this series. It is a joy to view every panel month to month. This book is a treat and deserves broader advertising. DC take note.

Hawkman is off to begin another story arc, another left turn for the character that is sure to please fans. This series is building up a lovely repertoire of DC lore under the radar. Give this and prior issues a good thumbing through.

Hawkman #26 is available wherever comic books are sold.

 

Hawkman #26
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TL;DR

This book is a treat and deserves broader advertising. DC take note  Hawkman is off to begin another story arc, another left turn for the character that is sure to please fans. This series is building up a lovely repertoire of DC lore under the radar. Give this and prior issues a good thumbing through.