REVIEW: ‘Funny Creek,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Funny Creek #1

Funny Creek #1 is published by Stout Club and presented through ComiXology Originals, written by Rafael Scavone and Rafael Alberquerque, art by Eduardo Medeiros, colors by Priscila Tramontano and letters by Bernardo Brice. Lilly is running. From what is unclear. But when her flight takes her dead into a street sign she awakens in her favorite cartoon show Funny Creek. Needless to say, she’s thrilled. However, things might not be all she thinks they are.

As Funny Creek #1 begins little Lilly sure is in need of some escaping. As she runs from someone, the rain pours and she seems truly scared. Something’s happened and she wants no part of it. So when her flight takes her headlong into a street sign she awakens in her favorite show. Perhaps the best indicator of how bad things were for her in the real world is that she doesn’t even question the how or why of her new surroundings. She just gleefully embraces them. As she begins to encounter many of the show’s cast she begins to completely fangirl out. Driving some characters to complete annoyance. But these complete awestruck moments give Lilly so much charm. She’s a child meeting people she never thought possible. Of course, she can’t shut up about it!

But, not everything is sunny in Funny Creek #1. It looks like the local trouble maker is at it again and the town’s sheriff Clumsy has to set things right once again. But while Lilly instantly knows Clumsy can defeat this enemy, after all he always does on the show, Clumsy seems much less certain. But Lilly is so lost in her own excitement that the trepidation of those around her doesn’t even register. Nothing quite like the unwavering devotion of a child. That devotion is at the heart of Lilly and this story. And it is delivered with skill.

Funny Creek #1

While Funny Creek #1 features a number of characters, it really is a one-person show. With Lilly being the star, everyone else feels like window dressing. Happily, this young girl’s unending energy is captured wonderfully through the writing of Scavone and Alberquerque.

The art in this book is deftly designed to fit its story. The cartoony look goes nicely with it’s narrative. Even when there is danger about the book doesn’t let things feel too dark. The overall look of the book is further enhanced through some quality character designs. Each character feels unique, eye-catching, and instantly noticeable.

While the linework in Funny Creek #1 is overall praiseworthy I can’t help but have a more mixed reaction to Tramontano’s colorwork. Overall it delivers well, in the case of Lilly however it feels a bit off. Her skin always has a bit of a red hue to it that feels off to me. While I presume this is supposed to simply be her skin color, it gives an extremely distracting impression to me. Rather than looking like her skin tone, it makes me feel like Lilly is constantly in different lighting than everyone else. Like when you see someone photoshopped into a picture and the skin tones scream that they weren’t originally there.

The last aspect of Funny Creek #1‘s visual presentation comes from Brice’s letter work. While nothing about the lettering here stands out, it does its job with skill. The story is easy to follow, and the various dialogue boxes never interfere with the reader’s ability to see the art.

When all is said and done Funny Creek #1 delivers a fun introduction to its narrative. Its exuberant protagonist is extremely charming, and almost gives the reader no choice but to root for her. I can certainly see this book providing a fun bit of escapism for those who may need it.

Funny Creek #1 is available now.


Funny Creek #1
4

TL;DR

When all is said and done Funny Creek #1 delivers a fun introduction to its narrative. It’s exuberant protagonist is extremely charming, and almost gives the reader no choice but to root for her. I can certainly see this book providing a fun bit of escapism for those who may need it