REVIEW: ‘Dark Nights: Death Metal,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2 is published by DC Comics, written by Scott Snyder, with art by Greg Capullo, inks by Jonathan Glapion, colors by FCO Plascencia, and letters by Tom Napolitano. Previously, readers were introduced to a devastated world ruled by the Batman Who Laughs. But hope finally emerged from the ashes when Batman appeared with an army and Wonder Woman, the warden of hell, killed the Batman Who Laughs.

Now, in Dark Nights: Death Metal #2, the remaining Dark Knights are out for blood as Wonder Woman, Swamp Thing, Wally West, and the stolen Batmobeast search for Batman. After reaching a cemetery that is said to be one of his bases of operations, the team meets up with old friends and works to stop the Dark Knights for good.

Batman and Wonder Woman’s reunion in the issue is sweet and shows the emotion complexities Snyder is able to create even in a series with a robot Batman dinosaur. Despite being marketed as a Batman book, the series continues to be centered around Wonder Woman. To be frank, this is my favorite version of Wonder Woman. In addition to having some of the fiercest shoulder pads on this side of the metaverse, Diana also decided to hop on the quarantine hair trend and is now sporting a blue ombre. The look is downright badass and Capullo’s art coupled with Glapion’s inks and FCO Plascencia’s colors makes her unforgettable.

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2

The dichotomy between Diana and Bruce is important. Unlike Bruce, Diana is not cracking under the immense pressure. She is able to still lead the people depending on her and make choices without second-guessing herself. Batman’s biggest flaw is always his inability to work well with others, even when the situation depends on it. It was also his biggest issue in the previous series, Dark Nights: Metal. Diana’s leadership ability reminds me of how many women in my family have kept everyone together through the toughest times when the men could not. Diana is a Steel Magnolia, a term derived from the movie of the same name that is a metaphor meant to showcase the “complex mix of strength and vulnerability exhibited by the women.” In a comic that could easily get bogged down in its world-building, the emotional beats between the two friends, who have a lot of sexual chemistry, creates much-needed levity.

The only real issue I have with Dark Nights: Death Metal #2 is Batmobeast’s dialogue. The dialogue is placed on a black background with blue letters and it is very hard to read. While it might be more legible on printed issues of the comic, I was squinting at my digital copy just to keep up. Other than that choice, Napolitano does well to keep panels from feeling crowded.

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2 is a Wonder Woman story — and a good one. The issue excels at creating emotional levity while also introducing readers to more head-banging concepts as an even bigger crisis emerges. The second half of this issue left me in shambles and I am on the edge of my seat in anticipation of the next issue.

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2 is available now in comic book stores and online through digital retailers.

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2
4.5

TL;DR

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2 is a Wonder Woman story — and a good one. The issue excels at creating emotional levity while also introducing readers to more head-banging concepts as an even bigger crisis emerges. The second half of this issue left me in shambles and I am on the edge of my seat in anticipation of the next issue.