REVIEW: ‘Supergirl: Being Super’ From DC Comics

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Supergirl: Being Super

Supergirl: Being Super is a graphic novel published by DC Comics. It is written by Mariko Tamaki (Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass), illustrated by Joëlle Jones with Sandu Florea, colored by Jeremy Lawson, and with letters by Saida Temofonte. The graphic novel collects issues #1-4 of the series, which were released in 2016.

Supergirl: Being Super is a retelling of Supergirl’s origins and how Kara Danver went from being a regular teenage girl hiding a secret to the fearsome pillar of justice and truth we know now. The first issue of the series, designated here as a chapter, is incredibly strong and beautifully sets up the unique identity crisis Kara faces. Like most teenagers, Kara is struggling with who she wants to be and who she is. However, this struggle is compounded by her mysterious past that haunts her in her dreams. When a series of bizarre earthquakes hit her home, Kara is forced to come to terms with who she is meant to be and why her powers seem to be fading.

The beauty of Supergirl: Being Super is how it positions Kara around other teenagers like her. Through her friends Jen and Dolly, it is easy to see how Kara views herself and the people around her. Despite not being an outcast, Kara can’t help but feel she does not belong. Growing up, I felt exactly like Kara. I often felt like the third wheel among friends and now I know that is part of having severe ADHD but I was not diagnosed until I was 25. ADHD is nothing like being from an alien planet and possessing god-like abilities but the analogy still works nonetheless. Tamaki does a fantastic job of making Kara relatable and giving a lot of emotional depth to the relationships between Kara and her loved ones. The complexities shown within the relationship between Kara and her parents, most specifically her father, is lovely.

Supergirl: Being Super
Additionally, Jones’ artwork, with Florea, is stunning. Anyone who read Tom King’s run on Batman or Jones’ run on Catwoman knows how spectacular her artwork can be. Jones excels at creating thought-provoking and interesting panel designs that keep action sequences feeling dynamic. The emotion she is able to capture in each character’s eyes is heartwrenching. Kara is expressive, beautiful, and looks like a teenage girl. Temofonte’s letters flow well with the art and never clutter the page even during action sequences.

Supergirl: Being Super is emotional and powerful. Kara’s journey into finding herself after experiencing a devastating loss is profound and what makes superhero stories matter. On top of that, Kara’s experience as a young woman sets her apart from most origin stories that make up comics.

Supergirl: Being Super is available now in comic books stores and through digital retailers

Supergirl: Being Super
4.5

TL;DR

Supergirl: Being Super is emotional and powerful. Kara’s journey into finding herself after experiencing a devastating loss is profound and what makes superhero stories matter. On top of that, Kara’s experience as a young woman sets her apart from most origin stories that make up comics.