REVIEW: ‘Hawkeye: Freefall,’ Issue #6

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Hawkeye: Freefall #6

Hawkeye: Freefall #6 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Matthew Rosenburg, with art by Otto Schmidt, and letters by VC’S Joe Sabino. Previously, Clint Barton has grown frustrated with the legal system after watching the Hood walk free. In an attempt to correct the wrongs of the world, Clint has dedicated his life to taking down the Hood as Ronin.

However, his reckless actions are not without consequences as his friends learn the truth behind his dual identity. In addition, Bullseye has learned Clint’s secret and has stolen his Ronin uniform. Now, in Hawkeye: Freefall #6, Bullseye is running around as Ronin and determined to hurt Clint as much as possible. Meanwhile, the Hood has put a price on Clint’s head.

After getting to Bryce, Clint quickly realizes how much Bullseye is playing with him at the expense of people he loves. The opening pages are incredibly emotional and it is easy to forget just how young Bryce is until you see how small he is bleeding out in Clint’s arms. Hawkeye: Freefall #6 is a lesson in why revenge is never as satisfying as you want it to be. Clint’s recklessness as Ronin, while well-intentioned, has ended up causing far more harm than good. Clint Barton’s ability to throw himself into the worst situations with the intention of doing good is his most admirable and relatable flaw. Unlike so many superheroes in comics, Clint Barton will always be the underdog and everyone loves rooting for the underdog.

Hawkeye: Freefall #6, for all its emotion, still retains the classic quips and sarcastic humor I look for in a Hawkeye comic. Rosenburg does a good job of keeping the tone of the comic consistent even during its heavier moments. This also helps keep the pacing of the story itself from slowing down too much.

Similarly, Schmidt’s art has a dynamic feel. He excels at close-ups and showing the emotions of every character on the page. That being said, my favorite moments from the comic are the action scenes. Between the panel design and brilliantly colored artwork, the sequences feel dynamic and lively. Meanwhile, Sabino’s lettering is consistent, concise, and never clutters the page.

Overall, Hawkeye: Freefall #6 is a solid issue with very few flaws. I wish the climax had a little more oomph but even that is me nitpicking. For fans of Hawkeye, this issue is a great jumping-on point if you have yet to pick up the series.

Hawkeye: Freefall #6 is available now in comic book stores and online through digital retailers.

Hawkeye: Freefall #6
4.5

TL;DR

Overall, Hawkeye: Freefall #6 is a solid issue with very few flaws. I wish the climax had a little more oomph but even that is me nitpicking. For fans of Hawkeye, this issue is a great jumping-on point if you have yet to pick up the series.