REVIEW: ‘Bleed Them Dry,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Bleed Them Dry #1

Bleed Them Dry #1 is published by Vault Comics, written by Eliot Rahal, art by Dike Ruan, colors by Miquel Muerto and letters by AndWorld. It’s the year 3333. In the International Republic of Displaced Peoples( A.K.A. the city-state of Asylum) humanity coexists with vampires. For the most part, the two races get along. Vampires have the same personality range as people. Some are good. Some are bad. And most are just trying to get through the day hoping tomorrow will bring something better. But someone in Asylum has started killing vampires, and no one can figure out who.

Bleed Them Dry #1 gives readers a first step into what seems like a new dark and gritty future. I say it seems like, because the world building is pretty sparse here. Given that Asylum appears to be a futuristic megalopolis, I assume it will fall somewhere into the Bladerunner end of the Sci Fi spectrum of futures. The one thing we know for certain about this future cityscape is that in a thousand years the cops are still the cops. Which lends credence to my grim future feelings.

Asylum is beset by a serial killer. This is a new one for the city, however. This one seems to be targeting vampires. Given their increased physical attributes there are only so many people who could pull off these kills. With a lack of witnesses and evidence, the police are bereft of leads. Detectives Halloway and Blake are leading the investigation. And with ever increasing pressure from their boss to close this case, their days are getting harder and harder.

Bleed Them Dry #1

Detective Halloway plays the part of Bleed Them Dry #1‘s lead protagonist. The classic honest cop trying to make a genuine difference trope is in full effect with her. She struggles with her sleep, as her concern for her case keeps her up at night. And there are hints of a past alcohol problem, just to hit all the cliches. While Rahal writes this character well enough, there isn’t anything that makes this character stand out in this first issue. This may change as the series moves forward, but as the reader’s eyes and ears in this issue, she presents a fairly bland point of view.

The art for Bleed Them Dry #1 does a solid job as well. While nothing of the designs, either world or character stood out to me, everything is nonetheless presented with a good deal of polish. Ruan’s panel layout does an excellent job of keeping the pages feeling fresh, while not becoming confusing. An often tricky balancing act to pull off.

The coloring work of Muerto stands on equal ground with the rest of the book’s presentation. Solid color choices are seen throughout the book. A good variety allows the various scenes to stand apart, keeping the books various moments from running together.

Lastly, the lettering work finishes off this book presentation nicely. Like it’s other elements, it didn’t blow me away but landed all the aspects I expect to find in its delivery with proper skill.

When all is said and done, Bleed Them Dry #1 is a solid start to a new Sci Fi story. While it doesn’t land with a resounding impact, there is certainly room to grow. We’ll just have to wait and see if the creative team can find the potential with the city of Asylum.

Bleed Them Dry #1 is available on June 24th wherever comics are sold.


‘Bleed Them Dry,’ Issue #1
3.5

TL;DR

When all is said and done, Bleed Them Dry #1 is a solid start to a new Sci Fi story. While it doesn’t land with a resounding impact, there is certainly room to grow. We’ll just have to wait and see if the creative team can find the potential with the city of Asylum.