REVIEW: ‘Plunge,’ Issue #4

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Plunge #4 
Plunge #4 
is published by DC Comics under the Hill House imprint, written by Joe Hill, art by Stuart Immonen, colors by Dave Stewart, and letters by Deron Bennett. Having been introduced to the island’s unique inhabitants in the last issue, the salvage crew discover fully what these beings are, what they want, and perhaps most importantly, what the creature can do to them if they don’t cooperate.

With Plunge #4 we get the crux of the situation delivered to us. While virtually all of this issue is just conversation, it is a great read nonetheless. The drastic differences in personality penned by Hill elevate the drama of the scenes. The interplay between  Gage Carpenter and Mr. Lacome is particularly strong. Carpenter’s moral outrage at what has been done to his crew is palpable. This is off set by Lancome’s greater concern with his parent company’s bottom line perfectly. While this dynamic is by no means new, it’s execution here is splendid. And while the aforementioned dynamic steals the scene in Plunge #4, I would be remiss if I didn’t also applaud Hill’s handling of the monsters as well.

The sort of cold, emotionless, precise tone comes across perfectly in Hill’s dialogue. This perfectly worded voice is further sold by Bennett’s excellent lettering work. The misshapen dialogue boxes and broken text help to polish of the inhuman personality of the monster.

Plunge #4 

Along with the excellent exposition in Plunge #4 is equally crafted artwork. Immonen helps keeps the pages lively with his emotionally charged panels. This is especially true for Carpenter. With each of his outbursts the reader can almost feel the heat of his anger. This creates a stark visual contrast to the emotionless island inhabitants.

Another aspect of Plunge #4  that Immonen captures perfectly is the reveal of what the true nature of the threat the crew are facing is. The monster itself is given all creepiness one could hope for. It’s presence on the page is vile, and emphasized beautifully with the exact moments Immonen chooses to capture it.

Complementing Immonen’s lines is a truly excellent performance on colors by Stewart. Heavy grey tones fill in the empty spaces and backgrounds of the panels. This grim color choice creates a weight to the panels. It feels entirely oppressive. As if the depressing colors of their surroundings are trying to snuff out the contrasting colors of cloths and people. This color based conflict only reinforces, and reminds the reader of the stakes at play.

With all the cards now on the table, its up to the crew to decide what they are going to do. Can they cooperate with this new entity? Is flight possible? Could they survive a confrontation if it came to it? Or perhaps another option they have yet to divine. While I don’t know which path awaits, what I do know is, thanks to the emotionally charged ground work laid out by Plunge #4 I am looking forward to finding out just how our stranded sailors attempt to get off this frozen atoll.

Plunge #4  is available June 23rd wherever comics are sold.

 

Plunge #4
4.5

TL;DR

With all the cards now on the table, its up to the crew to decide what they are going to do. Can they cooperate with this new entity? Is flight possible? Could they survive a confrontation if it came to it? Or perhaps another option they have yet to divine. While I don’t know which path awaits, what I do know is, thanks to the emotionally charged ground work laid out by Plunge #4 I am looking forward to finding out just how our stranded sailors attempt to get off this frozen atoll.