REVIEW: ‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Every Generation,’ Issue #1

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Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Every Generation #1 

I have been in love with the Buffyverse since I was a child learning what horror was and became even more obsessed when I finally started thinking of romance and vampires made the top of my list. As a life long fan of everything Slayer, BOOM! Studios’ reboot of the entire universe has been a sight to see. From Buffy: The Vampire Slayer and Angel to the epic crossover in Hellmouth the hits have kept on coming and have overwhelmingly worked to bring in new fans and satisfy the die-hard Buffy fan in me. Now, Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Every Generation #1 is telling a new story and it has been one of the titles I have been anxiously waiting to come out after the COVID delays in the industry.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Every Generation #1 is a one-shot that goes into the secret origins of some of the most important Slayers in history in the same style of Buffy the Vampire Slayer: The Chosen Ones one-shot published last year which showcased a diverse group of Slayer stories.

The trio of stories in this one-shot are “Where All Paths Lead,” “The Hilot of 1910,” and “The Sisters of Angelus,” and each feature diverse creative teams. The first of these stories, “Where All Paths Lead” is written by Nilah Magruder, with art from Lauren Knight, colors by Alex Guimarães, and letters by Jim Campbell. This one focuses on Buffy’s story as she confronts her grief of losing Willow in the main Buffy the Vampire Slayer series and is looking to fight in the Hellmouth for answers.

As a story, “Where All Paths Lead” requires that you have some background knowledge of the Buffy continuity. While the Knight’s art is great, specifically seeing a buff Buffy for the first time on the page and the storytelling from Magruder is well done, I can’t help but wonder if this title should have been used to tell a story of a different slayer, one we haven’t seen, and one that continues to diversify the slayer pantheon since Buffy does have her own title. That said, this is a great continuation of the existing story and fits seamlessly into the canon.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Every Generation #1 

“The Hilot of 1910,” the second story in Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Every Generation #1, is written by Morgan Beem and Lauren Garcia, with Beem providing the art and Campbell on letters. Set in a Filipino village, “The Hilot of 1910” tells the story of a slayer and her intervention with an Aswang, a spirit in Filipino folklore, who is killing women in the village.

This story is the simplest but features my favorite art and my favorite storytelling of the three. Beem and Garcia showcase Filipino culture in a way that will make those of that cultural background see themselves and their myths. But it also tells a human story in its folklore too. This is something we haven’t seen from Slayer stories and more like this can truly help not only diversify the Buffyverse when it comes to the cultural backgrounds of the slayers themselves, but the legends, demons, and evils they fight as well. Additionally, Beem’s art is a beautiful watercolor folktale in itself.

“The Sisters of Angelus,” the final vignette in this series, is written and illustrated by Caitlin Yarsky and also features letters from Campbell. Set in 1940s Dublin, the title of this story alone intrigued me. When her friend is sent to Angelus Asylum, the young Slayer Una sets out to save her, only to discover that there are vampires.

This story is a lovely tribute to the power of the original Buffy, including the iconic line: “the hardest thing in this world is to live in it.” It’s used beautifully and the final page of “The Sisters of Angelus” is gorgeous. There is also a larger commentary on women and when we are seen as fit to be discarded — or, rather, when we become too much of an inconvenience for men or don’t fit their standards.

Overall, Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Every Generation #1 is a great one-shot. While each story is powerful, the last two entries overshadow Buffy’s story. This doesn’t mean that it is bad, she handles a personification of grief and guilt in a great way. That said, the final two add so much lore and weight to the Buffyverse that it left me wanting more of their stories over Buffy’s and ultimately left me anxiously waiting until the next origins one-shot.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Every Generation #1 is available now.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Every Generation #1 
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TL;DR

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Every Generation #1 is a great one-shot. While each story is powerful, the last two entries overshadow Buffy’s story. This doesn’t mean that it is bad, she handles a personification of grief and guilt in a great way. That said, the final two add so much lore and weight to the Buffyverse that it left me wanting more of their stories over Buffy’s and ultimately left me anxiously waiting until the next origins one-shot.