REVIEW: ‘Suicide Squad,’ Issue #5

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Suicide Squad #5

Suicide Squad #5 is published by DC Comics, written by Tom Taylor, art by Bruno Redondo, colors by Adriano Lucas, and letters by Wes Abbott. Having tracked down Captain Boomerang in the last issue, only to walk into a trap set by their former comrade, the Suicide Squad move in to take Boomerang down. But with Jog getting caught in the opening salvo, the question isn’t whether or not the Squad can bring Boomerang in. The question is whether or not he’ll survive the experience.

With everyone on the Suicide Squad now up to speed about the alterer motives of the Revolutionaries, it’s just a matter of waiting for the right moment to confront Lok and learn who is really behind Task Force X. While waiting for their moment, however, they have to continue jumping through Lok’s hoops. And that brings us to Boomerang.

With his opening gambit dropping Jog out of the fight, Boomerang momentarily has the situation how he wants it. But there are nine other attackers, and it feels like Boomerang is well aware of how this is going to end.  Though he may have mistaken the new Squad for the thrown together mash-up teams of the past, leading to a mild underestimation of how they would take having one of their own set on fire. Suicide Squad #5 continues to build out the connections between its new characters, and, in doing so, makes the whole that they are more than the sum of their parts.

While the capture and retrieval of Captain Boomerang is the plot focus, the true center of Suicide Squad #5 is Jog. Taylor does a fantastic job fleshing out this new character. While all super heroes need a strong personality I feel this is especially true of speedsters in the DC Universe since it’s not like their powers help them to stand out at this point.

Suicide Squad #5

Getting to witness Jog’s past is a moving experience. The struggles that have plagued him and all the running he’s been forced to do to stay ahead of it makes the reader fully appreciate how cruel it is that, in order for Jog to have a chance of finding justice, he’s had to be forced into this.

Just as with every previous issue, Suicide Squad #5’s art keeps perfect pace with it’s finely delivered story. Redondo continues to capture these characters wonderfully. The reader is also constantly placed right in the middle of everything, making every moment of action that much more intense.

This intensity is further strengthened by Lucas’s every striking color use. The color palate utilized here continues to create a unique and striking feel for the narrative. I wish more comics could have illustrations whose colors shine this bright.

Lastly, there is the lettering. Suicide Squad #5’s lettering is a textbook of solid craftsmanship on the part of Abbott. All the text is clear, easy to follow, and never gets in the way of the art.

What transpires in the back half of this issue took me completely by surprise. Taylor, in one fell swoop rocked everything I expected to come next from this narrative. I’m so excited to see where this story goes now! This could be the start of something truly huge for our titular heroes. And I couldn’t be happier about it.

Suicide Squad #5 is available May 26th wherever comics are sold.

Suicide Squad #5
4.5

TL;DR

What transpires in the back half of this issue took me completely by surprise. Taylor, in one fell swoop rocked everything I expected to come next from this narrative. I’m so excited to see where this story goes now! This could be the start of something truly huge for our titular heroes. And I couldn’t be happier about it.