REVIEW: “Amethyst,” Issue #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Amethyst, Amy Reeder, Gemworld

Amethyst  #1 is written and drawn by Amy Reeder with letters done by Gabriela  Downie for the Wonder Comics, DC Comics imprint for younger readers.   The book follows Amethyst on the morning of her 16th birthday.  She’s like every ordinary teen, except she’s also a Princess Amethyst of Gemworld.

Reeder explains the duality of Amethyst ‘s life through some clever back and forth dialogue Amethyst has with her parents at the start of the book.  Her earth parents are just trying to be as supportive of the type of life their daughter has as ruler of another kingdom. Reeder is able to clearly define the care and tenderness of parenthood while also characterizing Amethyst as a loving child.  They say their goodbyes to her as she is needed in her kingdom.

This is where the trouble starts for her.  When she arrives in Gemworld, she recognizes that something is wrong.  Reeder showcases a world empty with people but filled with scenery. She draws in lots of crystal mountains and bundles. Some of these crystal bundles mimic the dress that Amethyst is wearing.  I love how purple is utilized in Reeder’s art and character designs.  She puts a lot of love into her artistic worldbuilding. Using her art as the foundation, Reeders utilizes her script to provide details of the missing Gemworld people. It is here where readers understand that Amethyst is a kind and caring queen, who worries about her people. She carries the burden of being responsible for her vacant kingdom with no signs of anyone anywhere.

In her attempts to discover what has occurred, Reeder introduces the politics of  Gemworld into the mix. I find that the script here is lacking. Reeder glosses over some brief history between a dialogue exchange between Amethyst and the leader of her neighboring kingdom. There are tension and anger between the characters but it does not hold much weight.  I sympathize with Amethyst’s desire to save her people. However, this exchange could have been a way to further our understanding of Amethyst as a leader as well as a history of her world.

Despite the script of Amethyst #1,  Downie on letters adds to the beautiful landscape that Reeder is creating. Amethyst’s narration is featured in purple text boxes. These boxes have a small white background to them that gives purpose to our protagonist’s inner thoughts. Downie’s lettering is always well placed against Reeder’s spacious world.   Any creature that made a sound, their effects were colored to match. I found this to be very fun and attention-grabbing.

This debut issue of Amethyst is an incredibly cute and fun look into how Princess Amethyst deals with being a leader to her people, as well as an ordinary earth girl.  While I think there is a lot of room for growth in the writer, Amethyst #1 is a great start for a book about finding the strength to do what’s right.

Amethyst #1 will be available to purchase wherever comics are sold.

Amethyst #1
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TL;DR

This debut issue of Amethyst is an incredibly cute and fun look into how Princess Amethyst deals with being a leader to her people, as well as an ordinary earth girl.  While I think there is a lot of room for growth in the writer, Amethyst #1 is a great start for a book about finding the strength to do what’s right.