REVIEW: ‘Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen,’ Issue #8

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Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #8

Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #8  (of 12) is published by DC Comics, written by Matt Fraction with art by Steve Lieber, colors from Nathan Fairbairn, and letters from Clayton Cowles. The satirical series picks up where the previous issue left off as Jimmy attempts to continue working at the Daily Planet, despite everyone thinking he is dead. However, after being reminded about his one-night marriage-stand, Jimmy is forced to leave everything again and heads to Gorilla City.

In the last issue, we saw Fraction play with the various versions of Jimmy we have seen throughout the years. This time, that idea is stepped up to a whole different level as four Jimmy Olsens begin to terrorize Metropolis following the disappearance of the real Jimmy. These four Jimmy’s are almost identical to the Supermen that came to Metropolis after his death. Once again, Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen pokes fun at major DC characters and events within the DC Universe’s lore. These niche jokes are like reading a love letter to DC Comics similar to the way the niche jokes in Teen Titans Go! To The Movies had me cackling while the rest of the theater sat in silence. From a robot Jimmy Olsen to a rad 90s Jimmy Olsen clearly meant to resemble Superboy, Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #8 isn’t afraid to make fun of its roots.

The story of Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #8 is a bit hard to follow. Part of this is by design since the series is making fun of comics in general which are known for their convoluted storylines. However, Fraction’s script is incredibly wordy. Because of this, the panels feel overcrowded despite Cowles’ best efforts. That being said, the series is still a slam dunk and must-read for any DC Comics fan because of the hilarious jokes about the DC Universe.

Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #8In addition to the hilarious script that perfectly encapsulates Jimmy Olsen’s quirky and over-the-top tenacity, Lieber’s art gives so much emotion to the character. The close-ups of Jimmy are extremely expressive. Lieber beautifully captures Jimmy’s awkwardness and dorkiness. Despite being a bit of a dunce, Jimmy is extremely likable and part of that is because of the way he is drawn. The art and panel design still feel reminiscent of older comics. Considering the main draw of the series is the fact it pokes fun at the comics medium as a whole, this aspect is incredibly important. In addition, Fairbairn’s colors are bright and closely resemble the color palettes used during the Golden Age of comics. Compared to most other DC books on the shelves, Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #8 is like looking at a ball of sunshine.

Overall, Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #8 is a fun ride, even if it is a bit wordy. This remains a must-read for fans of DC Comics and there is no telling where the series is headed in the few issues that remain.

Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #8 is available now, wherever comics are sold.

Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #8
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TL;DR

Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #8 is a fun ride, even if it is a bit wordy. This remains a must-read for fans of DC Comics and there is no telling where the series is headed in the few issues that remain.