REVIEW: ‘Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen,’ Issue #7

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #7

Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen is a 12-issue series published by DC Comics, written by Matt Fraction, with art by Steve Lieber, colors from Nathan Fairbairn, and letters from Clayton Cowles. The series is a satirical look at the DC Universe and its history as a whole while also following the various shenanigans of Jimmy Olsen. Previously, Jimmy was forced to leave Gotham after Batman informed him he could not protect him from whoever was trying to kill him. Despite Jimmy’s previous theories, it was also revealed that Lex Luther is not the man determined to kill Jimmy but in fact, the one that has kept him alive. Now, in Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #7, Jimmy finds himself seeing a shrink in an attempt to deal with the madness around him.

Every character in Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #7 including Jimmy is over the top. Their exaggerated movements and overly excitable dialogue make them standouts among the regular civilians and even supervillains that popular the world. The comedy in the series shines because of this. It’s like watching the characters of The Office or Parks and Rec navigate the daily near-death experiences of living in Metropolis or Gotham. Jimmy is charming but also more often than not, very stupid. Needless to say, it makes him almost impossible to not like.

Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #7

Fraction is a hilarious writer and considering his history on Hawkeye, he knows how to write funny, flawed characters. That being said, Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #7 can at times be needlessly wordy and the skipping timelines can be a tad confusing. Because of this, panels can feel cluttered despite Cowles’ best efforts to letter with clarity, something he is clearly skilled at considering his impressive resume. Still, the series is incredibly endearing and currently one of my favorites on shelves.

Lieber’s art is perfect for the series as it lives captures the aesthetic of golden age comics while still being modern and pleasing to look. This aesthetic is also created through Lieber’s panel design. He weaves between a more classic six-panel grid set-up and pages that offer a more dynamic flow. Lieber clearly works well with Fraction as the art leans into the jokes. Early in the issue, Jimmy’s therapist is describing the “different Jimmys” that seems to live within him, a clear jab at the fact no writer writes a character the same. During the scene, Lieber brilliantly draws each Jimmy distinctly. The visual gag plays perfectly with the dialogue. Additionally, Fairbairn’s colors are incredibly bright and bring back a lot of nostalgia for the older comics. Usually, DC Comics are associated with moody color palattes but Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #7 is painted with bright yellows and oranges.

Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #7

Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #7 is laugh out loud funny and doesn’t take itself seriously. Any fans of DC Comics should be reading this series. The series acts as a satirical look at comics and their history while also being a love letter to them.

Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #7 is available now wherever comic books are sold and online.

Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #7
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TL;DR

Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #7 is laugh out loud funny and doesn’t take itself seriously. Any fans of DC Comics should be reading this series. The series acts as a satirical look at comics and their history while also being a love letter to them.