REVIEW: ‘Transformers Galaxies,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Transformers Galaxies #3

Transformers Galaxies #3 is published by IDW Publishing, written by Tyler Bleszinski, with art by Livio Ramondelli, and letters by Tom B. Long. Transformers Galaxies is planned to be an anthology comic series that provides tangent stories to IDW Publishing’s new 2019 Transformers comic book series. The first set of issues is focusing on the creation of the well-known group of combiners known as the Constructicons.

Transformers Galaxies #3 further describes how the Constructicons were banished to a far-off planet known as Mayalax under the guise of sharing their talents with other worlds. In reality, the Constructicons are cast out to work for energon scraps on the colony world; forced to eke out a meager existence on a world that doesn’t appreciate their work. But why are the six bots banished after they worked so hard in rebuilding Cybertron? Why is Nominus Prime so adamant about keeping them at arm’s length? We finally step back from the last issue and explain just how the Constructicons got to Mayalax and why they’re so melancholy.

Focusing on the Constructicons is a good avenue in a Transformers spin-off; these six bots are well-known but also a bit of an enigma. There has always been a question of just what it feels like and how much willpower and cooperation it takes to combine. The Constructicons aren’t the only combiners in the Transformers universe but they are probably one of the most famous teams. So, although the Constructicons have been around in the Transformers universe for a long time, I don’t think there have been many comics that have explained this phenomenon combining. This issue really shows the inner workings of combining six minds and also reveals a sinister side to things. There is a reason that combining had been lost and why Wheeljack is very wary of bringing it back. We get a view of just how hard combining is to control and how easy it is to lose that control.

Transformers Galaxies #3

The dialogue is handled great in this issue. The Constructicons are a great team for many reasons, including they’re great personalities and how they interact with each other. The dialogue reflects these personalities well which I’m sure is hard when having to significantly differentiate six characters that are so close and interact constantly.

The dialogue also helps readers sympathize with this team of bots. The Constructicons here are obviously not Decepticons, not yet at least. These bots are a combination of snarky, funny, peaceful, rash, and timid.  They’re likable and their dilemma is one that anyone would sympathize with. Showing the hard work they’ve done and the confusion and betrayal the Constructicons have to deal with, the fear and confusion about being cast off, and the way they’re written off definitely makes their story an emotional one. So, it’s not only interesting seeing how the Constructicons act and think before becoming Decepticons, but it also goes to show the type of bots they were before the civil war. 

The dialogue is supported well by Bleszinski’s artwork and coloring. Bleszinski’s artwork expresses the multitude of emotions these bots go through beautifully: from worry and melancholy to elation and excitement. The dialogue and facial expressions work extremely well together and the coloring only adds to the tone. The coloring is gritty and almost unrefined, similar to the Constructicons themselves and similar to the Cybertron that’s still in disarray. The panels are pulled together by Long’s lettering, permitting easy transitions from panel to panel without cluttering the pages.

Transformers Galaxies #3

Now that we’re on the third issue, it’s apparent that time jumps aren’t going to be uncommon in this series. I’m normally not a fan of series that jump back and forth between the past and the present because I think it can make the story convoluted without good reason. However, for Transformers Galaxies, the time jumps are isolated to entire issues. In other words, we don’t see large time jumps within the issues themselves, but technically issue #3 takes place before issue #2.

I’ve read other comics that let the readers figure things out based on context clues, but, when this is done badly, it makes for a confusing read. So, what definitely helped was that the creators didn’t leave anything to chance and went ahead and placed a time and place stamp at the beginning of each issue to notify the reader of the time and place shift between issues.

Transformers Galaxies #3 goes into greater depth on why the Constructicons were on Mayalax in issue #2. The readers learn more about what it takes to combine and why this combining is so threatening to Cybertron. The creative team is doing an amazing job on this series and I’m excited to read more.

Transformers Galaxies #3 is available now in comic bookstores everywhere.

Transformers Galaxies #3
5

TL;DR

Transformers Galaxies #3 goes into greater depth on why the Constructicons were on Mayalax in issue #2. The readers learn more about what it takes to combine and why this combining is so threatening to Cybertron. The creative team is doing an amazing job on this series and I’m excited to read more.