REVIEW: ‘Basketful of Heads,’ Issue #2 (of 7)

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Basketful of Heads was the first series out of Joe Hill and DC Comics’ new horror imprint Hill House Comics. In issue number one we were introduced to June Branch and her boyfriend. Additionally, we were shown the hints of a sinister murder on Brody Island. Then, on the last page, a home invasion was set up with chilling art. Now, in Basketful of Heads #2, written by Joe Hill, with art by Leomacs, and colors by Dave Stewart, June struggles to outwit and outfight the home invader coming after her.

Basketful of Heads #2 is stark and relies on Leomacs’ art to tell the story, given the lack of dialogue in the first half of the issue. The decision to do this, to leave wording sparse, works well to fit the genre. A solid home invasion for the first part of the issue, we watch Jone hide until she finally checks to see if all is clear. The pages move us from the moment the last issue ended as the strange men move through the house, looking for her and demanding her boyfriend give them something that they’re looking for.

In these scenes, it’s not only Leomacs’ art that builds suspense but also Stewart’s colors that paint the panels in blue to show the darkness. This makes the intruders seem both human and otherworldly, making them a monster invading the home. Then, Jone fights back against one of the men who remained in the house and the magic of this horror series goes into full-swing while Jone pushes past a final girl trope and emerges a fighter from the beginning.

With her boyfriend abducted and the last home invader armed with a .44, Jone picks up the ancient Viking axe that I have been waiting to see in action since the title was announced. Swinging it against a guy set to harm her, Leomacs’ art shows a dynamic Jone as the fight hits its apex on the beach. Basketful of Heads #2 establishes the footing for the rest of the seven-issue series. In the first issue, the set up was calm and slow. Now, the pacing has picked up in a great way.

That said, the lack of dialogue does make for a quick read, and the inclusion of a chapter of Sea Dogs also makes the issue feel really short. While not a bad thing, the pace picking up at the end catapults the reader into the excitement that only issue number three can answer. As such, I’m hoping it will be a longer issue, or at least not feel as quick. That being said, that’s a very small critique for a series that’s shaping up to be a horror comic heavyweight.

Basketful of Heads #2 is available now where comic books are sold and online at through our affiliate link.

Basketful of Heads #2
4.5