REVIEW: ‘Tales From The DC Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night’ #1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Tales From The DC Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1 is published by DC Comics, written by Tim Seeley, art by Kyle Hotz, inks by Dexter Vines, Walden Wong, and Danny Miki, colors by David Baron, and Allen Passalaqua and letters by Tom Napolitano. It is The Blackest Night. Sinestro wields the power of the White Lantern. Instead of sharing this power with others, he instead hordes it for himself. His failing has condemned the universe to a tide of death.  But, there are still a few survivors who hold out against the might of the Black Lanterns.

As with the previous Tales From the DC Dark Multiverse titles, this book looks at how one of DC Comics’ major storylines could have gone. I was very hopeful for this title, having thoroughly enjoyed the previous Death of Superman entry. However, this story feels short of that book’s lofty heights. This falls mostly on the writing and how certain elements within the book feel too forced. This is present mostly in how they have certain characters make choices that feel too far from how they would usually act. It felt like the creative team was changing their personalities for the sake of the book reaching the ending they wanted rather than what fit the characters.

Tales From The DC Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1

Tales From The DC Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1’s biggest struggle comes in the form of Lobo. As one of the four primary characters in this giant-sized book, he has a lot of panel time. Lobo’s personality is a real struggle for me in this story. Whenever the story is trying to really push how dark and foreboding the situation is it has to almost compete with Lobo’s bombastic attitude. While he does end up being critical to the plot, I don’t think it’s worth the damage he does to the journey there.

My other major qualm with the characters comes in the form of Scott Free. I won’t go into details, as those would be major spoilers, but it suffices to say I think he makes a choice that is completely against who Scott is. This choice is required for the book to run its course, but I feel they should’ve found another way.

While Tales From The DC Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1 may have struggled with the aforementioned characters, I loved it’s handling of Sinestro. He bears the weight of his failure without losing who he is. He is both remorseful and arrogant over the course of the story. Sinestro has always been a villain with a rich history and depth of character and I was thrilled to see that depth on full display.

Tales From The DC Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1

The art in Tales From The DC Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1 delivers a solid showing. It does a good job of highlighting all the action that occupies much of the book. It further complements the feeling that this story is an action story. The pace never really slows down enough to feel like a horror tale and the art certainly doesn’t try to sell it as such either. With enemy limbs flying off with abandon, the art highlights the over the top nature of its situation. This is especially true with some of Lobo’s kills.

While this book delivers a solid story and fine art, it fails to truly deliver something great. The way the ending feels forced into a suitably dark place really took me out of it. But, if you have been enjoying the Tales From The DC Dark Multiverse titles, I’d say it’s still worth giving a look.

Tales From The DC Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1 is available now wherever Comics are sold.

Tales From The DC Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1
3.5

TL;DR

While this book delivers a solid story and fine art, it fails to truly deliver something great.