REVIEW: ‘Young Justice,’ #9 – Lost in the Multiverse, Part 3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Young Justice #9

Young Justice #9 is published by Wonder Comics, an imprint of DC Comics, written by Brian Michael Bendis, with art by André Lima Araújo (pg. 2-11, and 15-18) and John Timms (pg. 1, 12-14, and 19-22), colors by Gabe Eltaeb, and letters by Wes Abbott. Previously, the Young Justice team had landed themselves on Earth-3, a dimension where their sadistic, evil alter-egos appeared to be in charge and are willing to fight to keep that power. Upon arriving, the Young Justice team was immediately set upon by their counterparts. Meanwhile, Robin and Impulse received some help from this Earth’s Stephanie Brown, a.k.a. Batwoman.

Young Justice #9  opens up one month prior to the current timeline, in La Paz, Bolivia. Keli walks along a trash site with her friend as they scour the site scavenging for useful material and parts. The site is littered with all kinds of noticeable easter eggs from Wayne Enterprises, and S.T.A.R. Labs. It’s here that Keli finds her power source and becomes the Teen Lantern.

Young Justice #9

The story then jumps back into the present timeline where we see Teen Lantern battling with her counterpart, Hack. The two trade some Lantern energy back and forth as each one struggles to gain an advantage. From here we flashback once more to La Paz, Bolivia, as Keli confronts her friend. The two discover that perhaps the tech that Keli is now wielding is somehow siphoning off power from the Green Lantern Corps. Her friend suggests that she needs to give it up and notify someone in the authorities, or a member from the Justice League. Spooked, Keli makes the decision to activate the device and leave Bolivia for good.

There’s a clever nuance about how the story switches between the past and the present. In the prior issue, we only saw flashes of Teen Lantern and the moments in the present bring us back to those same panels to further expand on what happened. Issue #8 and #9 happen simultaneously in this instance.

I appreciate that Bendis took the time to work backward to flesh out the battle between the Young Justice team and their alter egos. Interweaving this with the origin story of Keli also worked really well. It’s something I’ve criticized the previous issues for so it is nice to see backstories to these new characters. The balance struck here was perfectly done.

Another problem Young Justice faced is that some of the earlier issues had a real issue with pacing. Everything moved too quickly along, making it clunky and disjointed. Young Justice #9 displays none of these issues. Bendis seems to have really found his voice, and his rhythm with these characters.

Araújo deserves particular mention. His illustrations of Teen Lantern’s back story were exquisite. While Timms art has been stellar for this entire series, Araújo captures Keli in a more honest way. So much so, that I’d love to Araújo develop a solo Teen Lantern story using this art style. The way he captures the dumping ground and later on the streets of La Paz were fantastically illustrated. Keli’s face has so much detail and life ino it.

This is not to take away the contributions from Timms however, as he continues to go above and beyond in his action sequences. Young Justice #9 allows him to unleash his creative prowess as the two Teen Lanterns square off and test their abilities against one another. Eltaeb does a fantastic job of coloring.

This is especially notable, given how the artwork switches with the timelines. The palettes used on Araújo’s art feel very authentic and pairs well with his art style. Contrasted in the vibrant, and energetic colors implemented for Timms action sequences. Additionally, Abbot has a large amount of dialogue to contend with in this issue. The lettering was balanced throughout the story. None of the panels feel cluttered or distract from the illustrations.

The issue has a really nice flow to it, and I really loved that we’re getting the detail I feel has been sorely lacking from this series. A certain depth has been added as the tension and danger feel genuine, as opposed to the earlier issues. Araújo’s art stole the show in Young Justice #9 and I hope we get to see more of it.

Young Justice #9 is available now wherever comic books are sold.

Young Justice #9
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TL;DR

The issue has a really nice flow to it, and I really loved that we’re getting the detail I feel has been sorely lacking from this series. A certain depth has been added as the tension and danger feel genuine, as opposed to the earlier issues. Araújo’s art stole the show in Young Justice #9 and I hope we get to see more of it.

1 Comment on “REVIEW: ‘Young Justice,’ #9 – Lost in the Multiverse, Part 3”

  1. This is promoting kids to act unsafe in the internet. Kids shouldn’t be encouraged to go “rouge” on their parent’s computers. This is a slippery slope

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