REVIEW: ‘Justice League,’ Issue #33

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Justice League #33, written by Scott Snyder and James Tynion IV, penciled by Bruno Redondo and Daniel Sampere, inked by Redondo and Juan Albarran, colored by Hi-Fi, and lettered by Tom Napolitano, is published by DC Comics. The fourth part of the Justice/Doom War finds the Justice League and the Legion of Doom dueling across Hypertime. Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, and the Justice Legion battle a newly upgraded Brainiac. Hawkgirl, the Monitor, the Anti-Monitor. and the World Forger duel Lex Luthor and Perpetua at the edge of the universe. Flash, Green Lantern, and the Justice Society travel to Atlantis on the word of an old ally.

This issue kicks things into high gear as our heroes finally go on the offensive. Snyder and Tynion continue to utilize the different aspects of DC’s history to tell their story, from the far-flung future that Kamandi and the Justice Legions inhabit to the depths of Old Atlantis. In a story that crosses time and space, there is virtually no limit to the stories that can be told and the writers embrace this concept. They reintroduce a classic DC Villain and a fan favorite DC Character within the space of a single issue and it’s handled smoothly. The coolest part is when the Monitor, Anti-Monitor, and World Forger combine their powers. It feels straight out of an anime and I loved it.

With the major League members engaged in battle, the emotional brunt of the issue falls on Hawkgirl and her anger has a target as Luthor killed the Martian Manhunter on his journey to doom. Snyder and Tynion pull on the threads from previous issues, giving weight to Kendra’s fury as she attacks Luthor. You feel for her and you want her to succeed. This emotional pull shows the mark of great writing.

Redondo and Sampere’s art, while serviceable, is a bit jarring. The first two parts of this issue were illustrated by Jimenez and the previous issue by Porter, so it feels a bit strange to see a change in artists again. However, the bigger problem is that Redondo and Sampere have very similar art styles. I wasn’t sure which artist illustrated which sequences, and that’s somewhat concerning.

That being said, Hi-Fi shines with their coloring work. Every page shines with brightness, whether the sequence takes place on the edge of outer space or the depths of the ocean.

Justice League #33 starts ramping up the stakes as the Justice/Doom War marches toward its conclusion. With the appearance of a certain character at the end of this issue, I can’t wait to see what Snyder and Tynion bring to the table in future installments. They’ve proven that they are willing to embrace even the craziest of concepts and that’s what makes good comics.

Justice League #33 is available wherever comics are sold.

 

Justice League #33
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TL;DR

Justice League #33 starts ramping up the stakes as the Justice/Doom War marches toward its conclusion. Snyder and Tynion have proven that they are willing to embrace even the craziest of concepts and that’s what makes good comics.