REVIEW: ‘Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III,’ Issue #6

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III

Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III #6 is written by James Tynion IV, illustrated by Freddie E. Williams II and Kevin Eastman, colored by Jeremy Cowell, lettered by Tom Napolitano, and published by DC Comics in association with IDW Publishing. Batman and the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, with the help of their respective allies, alternate reality counterparts, and even the Shredder, battle Krang for the fate of their respective worlds.

This final issue delivers the pulse-pounding action and the emotional catharsis that I’ve come to expect from this miniseries. A large part of this is due to Tynion’s stellar scripting; he brings all the respective plot threads to their natural conclusion here including the separation of the DC and TMNT Universes and the final battle at Kang’s Technodrome. But what really sells the issue is the various character interactions. It’s fun watching the TMNT meet their prime counterparts. It’s fun when everyone realizes that Nightwing and Red Hood bicker in the same way that Leonardo and Raphael bicker. And it’s touching when Batman bids the Turtles a fond farewell.

Tynion also works wonders when it comes to finding these characters’ voices. Batgirl and Donatello spout off technobabble, Michelangelo is a motormouth, and Casey Jones remains his hockey stick swinging self. It’s fairly clear that he enjoys writing Batman; more to the point, a Batman who feels human and cherishes the connections he has with his family and allies. Bruce Wayne may have lost his parents all those years ago, but Batman has found a new family and I’m glad this series has touched on why they are important to him. It gives me hope for what Tynion has planned for his upcoming run on Batman.

On the art side of the issue, Williams and Eastman go out in style, blending their respective art styles together and delivering an action-packed finale. I’ve spoken before about the beauty of this approach, but it actually feels like universes are bleeding together, and it makes sense that the original version of the Turtles, as well as their co-creator, would be involved in this universe hopping story. Williams’ hyper-animated style creates grand moments both grand, such as the Turtles tackling the massive form of Krang’s Anti-Monitor Armor.

Cowell’s colors are spectacular; particularly two images that see the Prime Turtles bidding their younger counterparts farewell, and the Bat-Family united. The former has a  bright hue, excluding the monochromatic shade of the Prime Turtles; the latter takes place at night, with the moonlight illuminating the heroes. It’s a great study in contrasts, and I wouldn’t mind hanging those images up on my wall.

Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III #6 is a stellar conclusion to an amazing crossover. Tynion, Williams, Eastman, and Napolitano managed to not only come up with a solid story and amazing artwork, but they also poured a great deal of heart into the series. Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III and its predecessors are a great example of how to do a comic book crossover.

Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III #6 is available wherever comics are sold.


Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III #6
5

TL;DR

Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III #6 is a stellar conclusion to an amazing crossover. Tynion, Williams, Eastman, and Napolitano managed to not only come up with a solid story and amazing artwork, but they also poured a great deal of heart into the series.