REVIEW: ‘Ghosted in L.A.,’ Issue #3

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Ghosted in L.A. #3 is published by BOOM! Studios, written by Sina Grace (Iceman), illustrated by Siobhan Keenan (Clueless, Jem and the Holograms) with Sina Grace, colored by Cathy Le, and with letters by DC Hopkins. Previously, Daphne’s ex-boyfriend stumbles into the Rycroft Manor. Just when Daphne thinks her life can’t get more complicated, after having the worst first date in history and living with ghosts, but when her ex confesses he is gay she has to put aside her own issues to be a supportive friend.

Daphne is so caught up in her own issues she doesn’t realize Ronnie, her ex-boyfriend is hurting. And while it would be easy to say it isn’t her problem, the two still have a connection, albeit not the one they used to. With the help of Bernard, one of the ghosts from the Manor, Daphne realizes not everything is about her. Bernard’s history is one of the most interesting parts of the issue.

He previously fought with this partner about going out because he was unwilling to face his fear of his co-workers and the world knowing he was gay. His insight into the situations leaves Daphne and Ronnie forever changed.

My one major issue with Ghosted in L.A. #3 is that it downplays Daphne’s feelings and her own hardships. Coming out as gay is not easy but at the same time, you can’t expect the girl you previously dated, who moved down for you because you weren’t ready to tell her you are gay to not be upset. At one point Ronnie comments that Daphne can just move back and transfer wherever because her parents have money.

That comment undermines Daphne’s own feelings and all the hard work she put into getting into school in California. Also, as someone who took an entire year off of college to do an internship, I can speak to the fact it is never easy to transfer credits no matter how much money your parents might have.

Furthermore, Daphne owes Ronnie nothing. While he is clearly having a hard time it is ridiculous to expect someone he hurt to drop her own feelings, projects, or whatever to comfort him. Additionally, Daphne’s character comes off as aloof and a tad unlikeable. This storyline and the use of gaslighting has left an unfortunate taste in my mouth, especially considering how much I enjoyed the previous issue.

Keenan’s art is the real shining star of the issue. The designs of the characters are beautifully done and their expressions carry a lot of emotion. Le, once again, makes the brilliant decision to color flashbacks in muted gray tones while the panels taking place in present-day are bright with colors you would typically gravitate toward when thinking of LA.

Overall, Ghosted in L.A. #3 is a disappointing issue that carries the narrative in a direction I was not expecting but also do not want. Ronnie’s poor behavior undermines what could otherwise be a beautiful and emotional story.  However, I do enjoy seeing more background on the ghosts but I worry that it is becoming shoehorned in to serve the greater narrative.

Ghosted in L.A. #3 is available now in comic book stores everywhere.

Ghosted in L.A. #3
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TL;DR

Overall, Ghosted in L.A. #3 is a disappointing issue that carries the narrative in a direction I was not expecting but also do not want. Ronnie’s poor behavior undermines what could otherwise be a beautiful and emotional story.  However, I do enjoy seeing more background on the ghosts but I worry that it is becoming shoehorned in to serve the greater narrative.