REVIEW: ‘Young Justice,’ #8 – Lost in the Multiverse, Part 2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Young Justice #8 is published by Wonder Comics, an imprint of DC Comics, written by Brian Michael Bendis, with art by John Timms, colors by Gabe Eltaeb, and letters by Wes Abbott. Previously, the squad had been bounced around the multiverse. From an animated Teen Titans style Earth, to Captain Carrot and the Zoo crew, and finally ending up facing down Kingdom Come’s Superman Earth. After some, “bonding” with the aged Justice League of that dimension, Doctor Fate sends them home. At least he thinks he has, albeit with a minor miscalculation.

Young Justice #8 finds the team on Earth-3, the so-called “Worst Earth” and home of the crime syndicate of Amerika, where Amaxon Thunder reigns supreme. Supported by her team of Luther-El, Speed Zone, Hack, Hex and, Drake. The team is immediately engaged in combat with their evil alternative selves.

The interesting twist keeping the issue fresh, and unpredictable, is the dialogue that’s provided by an unknown narrator, seemingly from this dimension. It serves as an interesting aid, as you try to keep track of the two plots unfolding before your eyes.

Young Justice #8

If not for the commentary from the mystery narrator, the issue would be all action. Oddly enough, I find myself not critical of this point. In a number of the previous issues, I’ve felt the storytelling has had many hills and valleys. The story needed some consistency and it appears Bendis was uncertain as to which story point to follow.

Bendis, however, has hit his stride with these characters and this story. The prior issue was hilarious and balanced with a great action sequence at the end of the story featuring the characters from Kingdom Come. Young Justice #8 is a lot more serious in tone. Employing a parallel plotline, Bendis focuses in on the mystery commentator from Earth-3, whilst Timms illustrates the raging battles between protagonists and their counter selves. Young Justice #8 pits each hero against themselves, culminating in some stunning illustrations. This was the type of sequence I was hoping for when the Young Justice team faced off against Lord Opal in issue six.

The detail in the coloring of these battle sequences is stunning from Eltaeb. One panel sticking out, in particular, was early on when Amaxon Thunder smashes Wonder Girl across the city. The illustration and the coloring capture a huge ray of red light from the directional force that hit Wonder Girl. The contrast of the city is vibrant and filled with neon. These colors could have easily been toned down and darkened but by using brighter colors, there is a lot of detail for Eltaeb to work with and showcase his ability.

Additionally, I absolutely adore how Abbott captures the lettering in Young Justice #8. The level of onomatopoeia is perfectly implemented and utilized in this issue. My biggest fanboy moment from Abbot comes in how he captures the introduction of the team members within the issue. The best example is the intro title of Luther-El which is done in the classic Superman 3-D style, but with the red coloring dripping over the framing of the letters. This serves emphasizes the major diffferences between himself and, Superboy. The work culminates in a brilliant ending and serves to set up a fantastic story for the next issue.

I’ve been dubious about this series, but I find myself happy to have stuck with the it now, as the story feels more defined. Young Justice #8 is one of DC’s sleeping giants and is one to watch out for.

Young Justice #8 is available in comic book stores now.

Young Justice #8
5

TL;DR

I’ve been dubious about this series, but I find myself happy to have stuck with the it now, as the story feels more defined. Young Justice #8 is one of DC’s sleeping giants and is one to watch out for.