REVIEW: ‘Justice League,’ Issue #31

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Justice League #31, written by Scott Snyder and James Tynion IV, illustrated by Jorge Jimenez, colored by Alejandro Sanchez, and lettered by Tom Napolitano, is published by DC Comics. The second part of the “Justice/Doom War” finds our heroes scattered throughout Hypertime. Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman, with the help of the last boy on Earth, Kamandi, battle Brainiac’s forces while Green Lantern and the Flash meet the Justice Society of America. Elsewhere, Hawkgirl, with the help of the World Forger and Monitor, decides to take the fight to Luthor and Perpetua.

The highlight of the issue is seeing the Justice Society back in action. Though their return has been teased in the pages of Doomsday Clock, this is the first time we’ve seen them in the Rebirth era of DC Comics and it provides Snyder, Tynion, and Jimenez with the opportunity to reintroduce them to readers both old and new. Seeing Jay Garrick and Alan Scott interact with Barry Allen and John Stewart is a testament to how far the respective legacies of the Green Lantern and the Flash stretch.

Another highlight is seeing Jimenez draw different heroes, as well as different eras of time. The past sequences with Flash, Green Lantern, and the Justice Society of America are vibrant and sunny, giving off the feeling of a bygone era. Meanwhile, Kamandi’s future is shrouded in darkness, with Brainiac’s sentinels prowling the streets in a nod to The Terminator. His characters also have a wide range of facial expressions; Kamandi’s eyes widen in shock as Batman pilots a sub-atomic spaceship, while the Flash has the biggest smile on his face when he announces the first Justice League/Justice Society team-up. Paired with Sanchez’s colors, this issue is a treat for the eyes.

Snyder and Tynion continue to mine the depths of DC’s history with this story arc, and they lean into the absolute freedom that the medium of comics allows. Comic books are amazing because the only limits are the imagination of the creative team; this issue has time travel, evil robots, microscopic space travel, and a talking alien starfish who calls Batman “Dad”. Very few comic book writers are willing to test the limits of the medium, but I’m more than happy that Snyder and Tynion are among them.

Justice League #31 not only re-introduces a fan favorite team to the forefront, but it also shows what comics are capable of as an artistic medium. Based on the last few pages, it seems like the creative team is only scratching the surface of an epic story.

Justice League #31 is available wherever comic books are sold.

Justice League #31
5

TL;DR

Justice League #31 not only re-introduces a fan favorite team to the forefront, but it also shows what comics are capable of as an artistic medium.