REVIEW: ‘Lois Lane,’ Issue #2 – “Enemy of the People” Part 2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

cover of Lois Lane #2

Lois Lane #2 is a part of a 12-issue mini-series published by DC Comics, written by Greg Rucka, with art by Mike Perkins, colors by Paul Mounts, letters by Simon Bowland. Previously, Lois published a story about the government’s policy to separate families at the border and later pressed the Press Secretary, Lee-Ane McCarthy who looks a lot like Sarah Huckabee Sanders, about information she had received about the administration purposely monetizing these separations. Now, as Lois begins to uncover an entire conspiracy into why a journalist ended up dead, she is forced to keep her secrets even from her husband.

Lois Lane has never really been in the public eye like Superman but since she was seen kissing the Man of Steel, the press is hounding her about “getting her house in order.” As far as they know, Lois and Clark are separated and Superman is a rebound for the famous reporter. The best part of Clark and Lois’ relationship is how Clark views Lois. He sees her as an unstoppable force, a brilliant woman, and devoted mother and wife.

However, in Lois Lane #2 Clark at times seems to forget just how strong of a woman Lois is. While I understand his concern, a lot of his mannerisms and dialogue seem to imply he is surprised Lois can take the beating from the press so well. At one point, he asks if he should have Superman intervene. Lois Lane has always been her own character and rarely been reduced to Superman’s girlfriend, and while I understand Clark’s desire to be protective, it just comes off as needy or overly-protective.

Lois and Clark talking over coffee in 'Lois Lane #2'

While Lois and Clark are handling the press, The Question is still in Moscow. In Lois Lane #1, the question was seen taking down a group of shady individuals in Russia as she investigates the mysterious death of a journalist. After exchanging notes with Lois, the two realize just how deep all of this goes as it becomes more clear this journalist was killed by her own government.

The best part of this book is Lois working as an investigative journalist. Lois is in a complicated situation as she is being hounded by the current administration. While trying to get a comment from a businessman, she is threatened because of her “fake news.” It is all incredibly similar to our current political climate.

The way Lois gets around all of the distractions is by sticking to her gut and being a journalist. It is refreshing to see even if it is unfortunately only in a comic book. Rucka excels at creating intrigued in a story that still has a lot of clues hidden in the shadows.

Despite being a story about an investigative journalist, Lois Lane #2 is ultimately a thrilling spy-drama that borrows elements from movies like Bridge of Spies to the television series HBO’s The Newsroom. Perkins’ art has a gritty undertone that fits the overall, realistic, theme of the story. Any other art style might detract from the themes being explored.

Additionally, Mounts’ colors add to the grit Perkins created in the panels. Overall, Lois Lane #2 is not without flaws but the overarching storyline and Lois’ work as an investigative reporter make it a must-read.

Lois Lane #2 is available now wherever comic books are sold.

Lois Lane #2
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TL;DR

Lois Lane #2 is ultimately a thrilling spy-drama that borrows elements from movies like Bridge of Spies to the television series HBO’s The Newsroom. Perkins’ art has a gritty undertone that fits the overall, realistic, theme of the story. It is not without flaws but the overarching storyline and Lois’ work as an investigative reporter make it a must-read.