REVIEW: ‘Analog,’ Issue #6 – Moving Targets Part 1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Analog #6 is published by Image Comics, written by Gerry Duggan, with art by David O’Sullivan, colors by Mike Spicer, and letters by Joe Sabino. The books pick up following the previous volume. Analog takes place in a world where technology has become so dangerous and privacy is a thing of the past so the world of espionage has become, in a word, analog, relying on paper trails to get information as opposed to the internet.

Analog #6 starts a brand new story arc, “Moving Targets.” Jack confronts Sam about the set up in San Fransisco. Deciding to investigate the situation herself, Sam travels to Washington to meet a spy but instead, meets a lot of opposition along the way. Lucky for her, or unlucky for the assassins hoping to take out Sam, Oona tags along.

Oona has consistently been my favorite part of this series and this issue is no different. Her fighting style is absolutely brutal and this issue pumps the gore up to the next level. The fight scene on the train is a bulk of the issue and with the neon backdrop on a lot of the panels, it has a dynamic feel similar to the movies John Wick or Atomic Blonde.

Additionally, O’Sullivan draws Oona in a lot of creative angles, utilizing a The Dutch angle, also known as a Dutch tilt, “a camera shot that sets the camera at an angle on its roll axis so that the shot is composed with vertical lines at an angle to the side of the frame, or so that the horizon line of the shot is not parallel with the bottom of the camera frame. This produces a viewpoint akin to tilting one’s head to the side.”

In addition to the interesting panel layouts, Sabino does a lot with the lettering choices. The font used to show cocking of Oona’s shotgun is bold and feels similar to the font used in Dirty Harry. The action words have a life of their own and their shape as much as their sound correspond beautifully to the action they are signifying. It helps fill in a lot of the movement that is sometimes missing from fight scenes in comics.

Even though Oona took on the bulk of the action, Sam doesn’t just sit idly by in the fight. Her character reminds me a lot of Helen Mirren’s character Victoria from the movie Red or Judy Dench’s M from the James Bond series. She’s an older woman but still spry enough to think fast when the situation calls for it. Older women do not often get starring roles in comic issues, outside of Aunt May’s recurring motherly role in Spider-Man, and definitely not starring roles putting them straight into the action. Analog #6 lets its female characters get down and dirty.

Analog is a fantastic spy thriller that takes themes from Cold War era fiction and applies them to a strange dystopian future that unfortunately doesn’t seem too far off. Analog #6 only adds to that. If you haven’t picked up this series yet and are a fan of James Bond, Mission Impossible or any major spy thriller series, I highly recommend this book. This new story arc isn’t necessarily the best place to pick up but it is also not the worst.

Analog #6 is available now everywhere comic books are sold.

Analog #6
5

TL;DR

Analog is a fantastic spy thriller that takes themes from Cold War era fiction and applies them to a strange dystopian future that unfortunately doesn’t seem too far off. Analog #6 only adds to that.