REVIEW: ‘Lois Lane,’ Issue #1 – “Enemy of the People” Part 1

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Lois Lane #1 is a 12-issue mini-series published by DC Comics, written by Greg Rucka (Wonder Woman, Black Magick), with art by Mike Perkins, colors by Paul Mounts, letters by Simon Bowland, and the variant cover from Jenny Frison. The issue follows Lois Lane, famed reporter of the Daily Planet, as she uncovers a serious threat that could affect her husband, Superman, and their family.

Lois Lane #1 features Lois breaking and publishing a story about refugee camps and how the administration is monetizing the separation of families, something that is relevant to our current political climate. However, after another journalist ends up dead, more than likely at the hands of the Kremlin, Lois realizes she has to watch her back as she dives into a new unraveling mystery. Lois Lane’s character shines when she is able to be a reporter, investigating the nitty and gritty of Metropolis. At one point in the book, Lois likens investigative journalism to espionage. And as someone who went to journalism school and spoke to one of the reporters who broke Watergate, I can’t say I disagree.

Rucka does a fantastic job at showcasing Lois’ detective skills as well as her overall thought process as a reporter. Sometimes in past mediums, Lois Lane is treated as an accessory to Superman, being nothing more than a girlfriend, wife, or more recently, mother. However, here Lois shines all on her own and while the book features Clark, his role is secondary.

This is also one of the rare instances where we see Lois and Clark having a more adult relationship – very different from the PG panels we have seen in Action Comics, Superman, and Supersons. My only issue with their relationship in Lois Lane #1 is Clark’s over-the-top need to point out how him and Lois are portrayed differently in the media when a photo catches her kissing Superman. The scene is meant to show the double-standard of the media but it feels forced and overall falls a little flat.

Perkins’ art adds to the grittiness of the comic. However, there are moments where faces just feel a tad off. Additionally, Mounts’ colors at time feel too dark. The scenes in Moscow are hard to see and I read this comic on my second screen which is 20 inches. That being said, the colors and panels might be easier to discern on physical copies.

Another small issue I have with this book is that outside of Frison doing the variants, there are no women on the creative team of a book about a powerful female character who has been a staple in feminist ideology, similar to Wonder Woman. But even with all of these issues, Lois Lane #1 has a fantastic and intriguing story that captured my attention.

So far, this series is an amazing addition to the plethora of Superman and Superfamily books on the shelves. It’s darker tone will appeal to more mature readers. Even if you aren’t a huge Superman fan, I recommend this book to fans of shows and stories like The West Wing, House of Cards, and The Newsroom.

Lois Lane #1 is available now in comic book stores everywhere.

Lois Lane #1
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TL;DR

So far, this series is an amazing addition to the plethora of Superman and Superfamily books on the shelves. It’s darker tone will appeal to more mature readers. Even if you aren’t a huge Superman fan, I recommend this book to fans of shows and stories like The West Wing, House of Cards, and The Newsroom.