REVIEW: ‘The Flash,’ #73

Reading Time: 3 minutes

We are still months away from the new season of The Flash TV show, but you can see more of “The Fastest Man Alive” by picking up The Flash #73. The comic is published by DC Comics, written by Joshua Williamson, illustrated by Howard Porter, with colors by Hi-Fi Color, and letters by Steve Wands. In The Flash #72, Barry Allen went up against his first major supervillain, The Turtle. After a boost of confidence, Barry managed to beat him and in doing so also saved the fate of Central City in the future. He then proceeds to continue his heroics and his relationship with Iris. Unfortunately, Iris puts herself in a dangerous situation and Barry rushes to save her and the bystanders. He succeeds in saving them but is shot near the heart.

The issue picks up with Barry in his apartment trying to figure out how to save his own life. He knows that he has to phase his hand through his chest to get the bullet out before it reaches his heart. However, he begins to doubt himself since he still doesn’t have total control over his powers. Things get much more difficult with Iris kicking on his door asking to come in. Barry must either decide if he’s ready to admit to Iris that he’s The Flash or somehow gain enough confidence to use his powers without any consequences. Meanwhile, The Turtle continues to plan to take over Central City.

Williamson continues to amaze me with just how well he’s able to write Barry’s character. Even after getting shot, Barry still worries about Iris and tries to hide his identity to protect her. It’s very reminiscent of the first season of the Flash TV show on the CW. However, The Flash #73 does a better job with handling Barry’s self-doubt when it comes to his powers. It feels much more personal since he’s the only one that knows about his powers. It’s something that only he can deal with. Instead of getting a pep talk from others, he alone has to sort everything out. It not only shows his growth in confidence but also in his ability to be a superhero.

One of the more interesting aspects of Porter’s artwork in this issue is how much it resembles a scene from a true crime film. Barry works as a CSI but that’s rarely a part of his life that readers get to see. Without going into spoilers, readers will be in for a treat when more of this police work is put into action. The eerie feeling that Porter’s artwork gives off during some of those panels is incredible. It truly feels unsettling. Williamson’s writing sets it all off while Porter’s art carries it forward. It would be incredible to see more panels like these in the future.

Things are getting even more serious and I am honestly on the edge of my seat waiting to read what happens next. The creative team is continuously making a memorable Year One story. Barry’s character has been written well by Williamson throughout the entire arc. It gives an interesting new take on a hero that has made such an impact on my life. The ending has set up quite an interesting challenge for Barry to deal with. But one thing is for sure, this will be one of the fiercest challenges of his entire career of being The Flash.

The Flash #73 is available now wherever comic books are sold.

'The Flash,' #73
5

Summary

Things are getting even more serious and I am honestly on the edge of my seat waiting to read what happens next. The creative team is continuously making a memorable Year One story. Barry’s character has been written well by Williamson throughout the entire arc.