REVIEW: ‘The Warning,’ Issue #8 – “A Place Beyond Tears”

Reading Time: 3 minutes

The Warning #8

The Warning #8 is published by Image Comics, written by Edward LaRoche, with art by Edward LaRoche, colors from Brad Simpson, and letters by Jaymes Reed. The series follows a violent alien invasion and the subsequent response from a group of genetically enhanced US soldiers.

In the prior issue, we were introduced to the planet and the race of aliens who are intent on taking Earth by force. The pace intentionally sauntered slowly forward, instead of greeting the reading with some stellar blood-curdling graphics. The Warning #8 however, is set to a full-fledged anxious sprint. The first three pages spend a short amount of time to reintroduce us to the present situation on Earth, set two hours after the orbital attacks and destruction in California.

The Warning #8

The remainder of the comic focuses on the efforts of Lieutenant Joshua and the Two Six squadron as they hunt down the ‘Red Machine.’ The issue is all action, and yet, continues the theme and tones that were so strong in the prior. That feeling of tension, shock, and horror. This is due largely in part to the illustrations, and the colors of LaRoche and Simpson.

The colors are frighteningly accurate to that of looking at a picture. It resonates the true destruction of the landscape surrounding the survivors. The multitudes of shades capture the small details second by second. Simpson really reaches above and beyond with the active battlefield and specifically that of the behemoth, the Red Machine. Each frame it’s presented in a different level of coloring mixed with the explosive backgrounds. Visually, this comic series really does stand apart.

I have waxed lyrically about the illustrations in prior reviews and yet again LaRoche continues to score high marks. Each panel captures a brilliant amount of detail. If you focus in, the lines are drawn out of focus, the doubled line in their application to give a distorted view. A unique view as the Red Machine powers forward, rushing to attack Lt. Joshua as the lightning strikes towards or outwards from the alien invader. This is captured time and time again throughout The Warning.

LaRoche continues with a minimal amount of dialogue and if you’ve read my prior reviews, I’ve been slightly critical of not having more depth or story to go off of. I would say that this still applies in this issue, but added to this is that the dialogue from the second half of the story which feels somewhat jarring and took me out of the sci-fi horror tone. Lt. Joshua has spent so much of the series playing the strong and silent type so when he does get the chance, it felt forced and out of character. Given the transcendent nature of the visuals, I expected a little more depth, and with eight issues in I’m still feeling like we’re missing the underlying story here.

Reeds’ contribution is certainly worthy of note, his placement of the lettering doesn’t take away from the story. He clearly identifies the different mediums of conversations well, given the militaristic nature of the series switching from radio contact, to in-person conversations.

The beauty of The Warning #8 is that while the dialogue sometimes feels like it’s lacking, the optics are beyond stunning, and are packed with enough detail they tend to add a significant layer to the primary plot.

The Warning #8 is available now wherever comics are sold.

The Warning #8
3.5

TL;DR

The beauty of The Warning #8 is that while the dialogue sometimes feels like it’s lacking, the optics are beyond stunning, and are packed with enough detail they tend to add a significant layer to the primary plot.