REVIEW: ‘Young Justice,’ Issue #6

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Young Justice #6

Young Justice #6 is published by Wonder Comics, an imprint of DC Comics. The issue is written by Brian Michael Bendis, with art from John Timms, and Alejandro Sanchez, colors by Gabe Eltaeb, and letters by Wes Abbott.

Previously, the Young Justice team were in the middle of a skirmish with Dark Lord Opal. As the balance of the battle started to tip in favor of the earth-born heroes, Opal used his power to distort reality and manufacture an escape route. Now, as we rejoin the team in Young Justice #6, they’re in the process of re-grouping after witnessing the power of having reality, space, and time manipulated. The final fight stands before them as they sit on the edge of the castle that belongs to the villain that’s messed with all of these young heroes.

Overall, I find myself very conflicted about this issue given it is the finale of this particular story arc. What stands out most about the re-introduction of Young Justice is the characters themselves. Tim, Cassie, Connor, and Bart particularly shine above all others. Bendis is able to capture the deep bond between them. Their individual wit and the banter they share between each other sweeps you up in the team mentality. A particular highlight is watching Impulse and Superboy serve one-liners back and forth at other. There were some brilliant moments in this issue that had me cracking up, and has me eager for more future stories.

However, my complaints lie with the through-line of the story, or the lack thereof. Ultimately, there’s just too much story to tell in a short period of time and it really shows.

The issues leading up to this point, and part of this issue itself, is dedicated to the backstories of particular character arcs. While I have no complaint with that, because I think it was delivered fantastically, it left very little room to reinforce the main threat of the story. Gemworld and Dark Lord Opal are not given the room to develop as threats in the story. Not only this, but there was little time spent on developing the debut characters Amethyst, Teen Lantern, or Jinny Hex. I found this completely perplexing given they’re not only new to Young Justice, but to DC in general. Additionally, the ending, without venturing into spoiler territory, lacked anything adventurous and the conflict had very little depth or tension associated with the hype of the villain.

Believe it or not, I still actually really enjoyed this series. The character arcs really do elevate the story, and perhaps the intent from Bendis was less about the threat, but the potential of a threat to bond this team together for future issues. One thing you can not fault are the illustrations by Timms. The very first two-page spread is spectacular. Timms has you wanting to spend time on the page overlooking all of the detail he has meticulously crafted onto each panel. Added to this are Eltaeb’s coloring and Abbott’s letters. The combination creates a creative slam dunk visually for Young Justice #6.

Overall, more care should have been taken on Young Justice and likely it should have been given a 12-issue arc to really devote the time necessary to flush out all of the characters, and the story properly. Regardless, it’s a fun series, and I’m hopeful of what’s to come in the tie in series that follows this.

Young Justice #6 is available now everywhere comic books are sold.

Young Justice #6
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TL;DR

Overall, more care should have been taken on Young Justice and likely it should have been given a 12-issue arc to really devote the time necessary to flush out all of the characters, and the story properly. Regardless, it’s a fun series, and I’m hopeful of what’s to come in the tie in series that follows this.