REVIEW: ‘Transformers,’ Issue #6

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Transformers #6 is published by IDW Publishing, written by Brian Ruckley, with art by Beth McGuire-Smith, and lettering by Tom B. Long. In this issue, Orion Pax (or, as he will later be known, Optimus Prime) visits Codexa, a Cybertronian who has chosen to grow back into Cybertron itself. Codexa has known both Orion Pax and Megatron for a long time and once saw great potential in them. As such, Orion Pax seeks guidance and advice on how to deal with Megatron as he becomes a stronger and more influential political figure.

Transformers #6 gives us important flash-backs of these two before either of them make a name for themselves. Before Megatron becomes a political figure for the Ascenticons and before Orion Pax becomes the head archivist, they were first, and foremost, friends.

This issue was unexpected. It resolves nothing of what happened in the previous issue. We don’t find out what happens to Rubble nor do we see any development in the murder investigation. So, if you were on your toes about the cliffhanger from the last issue, you’re going to be waiting a little longer to find out what happens.

Despite this, the issue was a good interlude. We finally get more information on Megatron and Orion Pax. These two are big hitters in the Transformers series and have been on opposite sides of a war that lasts 4 million years. Therefore, it’s refreshing to see these two go back to their roots. These two had each other’s backs and even shared some of the same fears in their younger days. Orion Pax and Megatron are often juxtaposed so it’s interesting to see them being amiable.

In this issue, we also learn more about the politics and laws of the times. In fact, this issue refers to “The Nominus Edict,” an order with far-reaching consequences. Instead of just referencing the edict, the creators put a single panel in the comic that lists an abbreviated version of the edict. Being able to read this decree, even if abbreviated, opens up the audience’s understanding of Cybertronian politics a little more as we find out that this edict is not something that every Cybertronian agrees with.

The dialogue reflects the characters’ personalities and situations well and from it, you can tell how the process of being reabsorbed into Cybertron is affecting Codexa. Both Orion Pax and Megatron’s dialogue in the flashbacks reflect how comfortable the two are with each other. There is no animosity towards one another. They even tease each other. In the present, Orion Pax’s dialogue reveals just how unsure he is of himself and his choices in regards to Megatron. This is very different from the seemingly infallible leader we’ve come to expect Orion Pax to evolve into.

Unlike previous issues, the art is created by a single artist, Beth McGuire-Smith. Although the previous artists were talented, this art style is particularly appealing. The use of colors and shading really pull the tone of each panel together. For example, the panels in which Orion Pax is speaking to Codexa and trying to surmise if he can trust his old friend are deeply shaded with shadows and colored in tones of blue. These panels reveal the darkness swirling within Orion Pax, reflecting his mistrust and insecurity and the weight of the decisions he has to make.

Although I’m looking forward to seeing the murder investigation culminate, this small interlude to evaluate the relationship between Orion Pax and Megatron was insightful and reveals more about the political atmosphere of Cybertron.

Transformers #6 is available now everywhere comic books are sold.

Transformers #6
5/10

TL;DR

Although I’m looking forward to seeing the murder investigation culminate, this small interlude to evaluate the relationship between Orion Pax and Megatron was insightful and reveals more about the political atmosphere of Cybertron.