REVIEW: ‘Transformers,’ Issue #5

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Transformers #5

Transformers #5 is published by IDW Publishing, written by Bryan Ruckley,  with art by Angel Hernandez, Anna Malkova, and Sara Pitre-Durocher, colors by Joana Lafuente, and letters by Tom B. Long. In the fifth issue of IDW’s new Transformers series, the investigation into Cybertron’s first murder case continues. In this issue, we get a few small glimpses of Megatron and his political stances, along with Prowl and Chromia in their continued investigation. However, Transformers #5 mainly focuses on Rubble and Bumblebee.

Rubble has seemed to find a job that he likes. However, his elation is short-lived. On Rubble’s first walk home alone, things go very awry. All the while, Bumblebee has a secret that could get him into a lot of trouble. In this issue, there’s not much advancement in the murder investigation. Instead, the focus is on Rubble. There are a large number of panels showing Rubble and his thoughts as he walks through the streets of Cybertron.

These panels really remind you just how vulnerable and innocent Rubble is. In this way, the dialogue really suits this issue. The substance and tone of Rubble’s inner monologue reflect how new the world is around him. With an inner-view of Rubble’s thought process, the reader learns new tidbits of information about the state of Cybertron without seeming too forced or dense. Since this issue is so Rubble-focused, if you’re not sold on Rubble as an interesting character, this issue will be slow.

What is exciting about this issue is that the secret Bumblebee has been holding on to for the last few issues has finally come to light, at least in part. And I will say, this secret is not a letdown. There still remains plenty of questions about this newly-revealed secret but it definitely means we can expect more drama in the future. Who doesn’t like drama?

As stated previously, there’s not much advancement in the plot revolving around the murder case. However, there is a new element added to the investigation, making things potentially much more complicated. Whether this complication ends up deepening the story or being a needless addition will depend on what the next few issues bring. For now, it adds more mystery to the case.

The art, linework, and coloring are typical of past issues. The lettering keeps things simple and the panels don’t feel overcrowded. What made getting through this issue much easier is the use of a variety of different speech bubbles. The speech bubbles are color-coded and uniquely shaped to differentiate between inner monologue, tone, spoken word, and words spoken over long-distance communication. Some panels have a combination of different speech so the choices for using different colors and shapes make following the conversations easy and the transitions much smoother.

Overall, this issue resolves little to any of the plot. There’s more complexity added to the murder investigation, but it does reveal, at least partially, what Bumblebee has been doing in his spare time. This issue does leave off on a cliffhanger, and, overall, leaves the readers with a lot more questions than answers. Despite this, or perhaps because of this, I’m looking forward to the next few issues in this new Transformers series.

Transformers #5 is available wherever comic books are sold.

Transformers #5
4

TL;DR

Overall, this issue resolves little to any of the plot… This issue does leave off on a cliffhanger, and, overall, leaves the readers with a lot more questions than answers. Despite this, or perhaps because of this, I’m looking forward to the next few issues in this new Transformers series.