REVIEW: ‘Batman and the Outsiders,’ Issue #1

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Batman and the Outsiders #1

Batman and the Outsiders #1, is published by DC Comics, written by Bryan Edward Hill, illustrated by Dexter Soy, colored by Veronica Gandini, and lettered by Clayton Cowles. The Outsiders were recently reborn in the pages of Detective Comics and now they have a new ongoing series and with it, new threats to combat.

The comic opens with a young lady named Sofia Ramos being attacked by a metahuman named Ishmael. He kills her father and triggers her own latent abilities. Years ago, Batman saved the Ramos family from a horrible experiment and promised to protect them, a task he now entrusts to the Outsiders. But the team has its own problems as Black Lightning distrusts Batman, Signal is suffering from mental and physical trauma a villain inflicted on him, and Orphan struggles with a fear of the future.

Hill previously wrote the Outsiders in a five-issue arc of Detective Comics, appropriately titled “On The Outside,” and this issue picks up several threads from that arc, including Black Lightning’s unease at being the team leader and Batman’s faith in him. The character work in this issue is stellar. Hill takes the time to work with each character and highlight the bonds or lack thereof, between them, especially in regards to Black Lightning’s relationships to the rest of the team. Jefferson Pierce feels out of place in Gotham and asks Katana for her help in forging the Outsiders into an effective team; while he constantly questions Batman’s motives and deals with Signal’s insubordination.

Hill’s writing is bolstered by Soy’s art, which has steadily been evolving with every series he’s been involved with. Soy brings an anime style/flair to his art, particularly in the opening pages. His characters move with a dancer’s grace, especially with the way he draws Katana and their incredible expressions of fear, regret, and anger serve as a reminder that behind the masks and powers, these people are still human.

Gandini’s colors are stunning as well as the approach she takes to Batman and Black Lightning. Black Lightning, in both his costume and his identity as Jefferson Pierce, is always standing in the light and when he uses his powers, electricity crackles off him, bathing the page in a bluish-white aura. Batman, on the other hand, is shrouded in shadows, and as Bruce Wayne his eyes are always hidden, making his facial expressions hard to read.

Batman and The Outsiders #1 is the result of a talented writer, an amazing artist, and a brilliant colorist working together, much like the Outsiders themselves. Each person brings a different skill to the table and the end result is nothing short of magnificent. Hopefully, future issues will continue this trend.

Batman and the Outsiders #1 is available everywhere now comic books are sold.

Batman and the Outsiders #1
5

TL;DR

Batman and The Outsiders #1 is the result of a talented writer, an amazing artist, and a brilliant colorist working together, much like the Outsiders themselves.