REVIEW: ‘Green Lantern,’ Issue #5

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Green Lantern #5

Green Lantern #5 Blackstar at Zenith is published by DC Comics, written by Grant Morrison, art by Liam Sharp, colors by Steve Oliff, and letters by Tom Orezchowski. With Hal Jordan having left the Green Lantern Corp and turned to the Blackstar, he must prove his loyalty in a series of trials designed to push him to his very limits, and armed with only his wits, and not his cosmic weapon.

I always enjoy a story where a Green Lantern has to over come the situations facing them without the “get out of jail free card” the ring. This issue delivered on the promise of bringing the Green Lantern comic back in the scale that was promised when Morrison took on writing duties, and I am thoroughly enjoying the fresh approach to the intergalactic police force that is the Green Lantern Corp.

The back and forth between Hal and the Countess is a well written script that lets them test the other’s positions within their discussion, and lets that old Hal Jordan confidence shine in a way that isn’t obnoxious or grating. Instead it feels like the natural attitude of one who is often considered the greatest Green Lantern.

The art is a wonderful compliment to the story. Sharp creates a world that has the gothic presence it is so clearly intended. It is the kind of darkness that could threaten to swallow even the brightest of lights and never even notice its passing. The colors are also expertly chosen by Oliff, keeping the mood dark, allowing Jordan to be center stage in his clashing Green Lantern uniform, but not so dark that it becomes difficult to tell what is happening within each panel. The creature designs, while of a very classic variety, are all handled expertly, adding the final touch to this darkened nightmare the story must traverse.

As you are presented with the concepts and guiding principles behind the Blackstars – at least as they are shown to Hal Jordan – we are reminded how someone could genuinely find such a group, despite their obvious violent tendencies appealing.

It gives the villain an heir of authenticity. They certainly do seem themselves as the villain at least, and there is even a glimpse deeper into the characters history which, I feel, tells much about them.With this read I find myself even more eager to see where this plot is headed, and that’s before the cliffhanger ending puts the situation on its head.

While I have not always found Hal Jordan to be the most unique, or exciting character in DC’s stable, he is often a very interesting one. When taken out of his comfort zone and forced to question the things around him, he is great. In this respect I find myself applauding Morrison for finding something interesting to do with Green Lantern, that doesn’t involve him simply battering things with constructs from his ring.

Green Lantern #5 is available everywhere now.

Green Lantern #5
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TL;DR

In this respect I find myself applauding Morrison for finding something interesting to do with Green Lantern, that doesn’t involve him simply battering things with constructs from his ring.