REVIEW: ‘Beneath the Dark Crystal,’ Issue #7

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Beneath the Dark Crystal

Beneath the Dark Crystal #7 is published by BOOM! Studios, under the Arcadia imprint, written by Adam Smith, illustrated by Alexandria Huntington, colored by Laura Langston, and lettered by Jim Campbell.

The journey of self-discovery continues, if a bit slowly, as both Kensho and Thurma learn more about themselves and what they truly want as they quest through the world of Thra. Kensho confronts what he truly in a confrontation with the skesis within the Prism and takes his next step in his adventure. Meanwhile, Thurma continues to face the trial of building the glass castle and her frustration with The Fire that Stays grows all while wondering what is right.

I appreciated the places this book is going as it endeavors to move its protagonists through their stories but the pacing felt very off. It felt both a little plodding and yet at the same time moments were visually rushed. Only two significant moments happen in the book, one of which doesn’t lead to a true conclusion in the situation. Yet the layout of the panels felt as though I had skipped a step in the sequence of events and as if they had so much to do they needed to rush. It wasn’t so bad that I didn’t know what was going on per se, but enough that it took me out of the story on more than one occasion.

Adam Smith’s dialogue is good, as it succeeds in delivering the story’s message clearly, but without it feeling dumbed down. The lessons of hope and strength through trust and cooperation that has always been key pillars of the Dark Crystal lore are on full display.

The art team of Huntington and Langston continue to provide clear, unique spaces for the characters to appear in. The space with the Prism was particularly memorable as its colors and backgrounds are used to excellent effect in augmenting the presence of the various characters within the scene. It lightens while the mystic speaks kind words to Kensho and darkens in an intimidating fashion when the skesis speaks, adding a feeling of classic high drama to the proceedings, that some might feel a bit heavy-handed, but I thoroughly enjoyed.

Thurma’s side of the story has her and Nita being forced to look beyond what they thought or believed to come to solutions to problems they are faced with. With these experiences promising growth, and I look forward to how the story will play out, even if I’m fairly confident I know where it is going.

In the end, I feel that while Beneath the Dark Crystal #7 was a bit slower, and it leaves me feeling more certain I have a solid idea of how it will end, but I look forward to it nonetheless. The tale being told is a positive, uncomplicated story of people finding good, both in themselves, as well as the world all around them. And I for one am here for it.

Beneath the Dark Crystal #7
4

TL;DR

The tale being told is a positive, uncomplicated story of people finding good, both in themselves, as well as the world all around them. And I for one am here for it.