REVIEW: ‘Captain Marvel,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Captain Marvel #2

Captain Marvel #2 is published by Marvel Comics, written by Kelly Thompson, with art by Carmen Carnero, colors by Tamra Bonvillain, and letters by VC’s Clayton Cowles.

Previously, Captain Marvel has a confrontation with Nuclear Man that leaves her in a dystopian land where time is speeding by as a rag-tag rebellion is looking for a leader.

Now, following Nuclear Man’s hasty retreat from Captain Marvel and her several new-found allies, she is brought up to speed on what is known about this dystopian Roosevelt Island. With Nuclear Man, and his toxic sense of self-importance running the show, all the other men have been taken prisoner while Captain Marvel and Co. must protect those who are left on the island from his clutches. But war plans are quickly interrupted by a sudden assault and the heroes must rush out to face the onslaught before they can figure out how to fight back.

Kelly Thompson is at the top of her game with Captain Marvel #2. Everything I’ve come to love about her writing is on point throughout this issue. All the characters are overflowing with personality, and feel immensely real, while somehow still having that larger than life comic book aura about them. She paces the book fantastically as the story flows between action and plot while never feeling too slow.

But what I love the most about this issue is the continuing message being told through the antagonist. Nuclear Man is a raging misogynist of the highest order. But what I find so fantastic about the approach to this character isn’t his attitude toward woman, but toward men. It’s mentioned that he cannot handle the presence of anything he deems as a threat, and so has moved against all the men on the island, even though there are several superheroines present. The harm done by toxic masculinity on the male gender is often a grossly overlooked problem and it makes me so happy to see this issue being put front and center in this amazing comic.

Carnero’s art is also a visual delight. Some great costume designs ratchet up the cool looks. I love how in the middle of the action the angles make every panel feel.  This sense of being in the middle of it all is equaled to the capture of emotion being portrayed by the characters. The light and shadow are used to highlight just the right feeling in all the right moments and came together to create a great visual presentation that perfectly complements the story.

The final page introduces a new player to the field and leaves you on a great cliffhanger and I love a great cliffhanger. I cannot wait to see where the story goes from here.

If you love excellent storytelling, great art, or a comic with a fantastic message, I highly recommend this book as a must grab on your next trip to your local comic shop. Or however, you acquire your comic books.

Captain Marvel #2
5

TL;DR

If you love excellent storytelling, great art, or a comic with a fantastic message, I highly recommend this book as a must grab on your next trip to your local comic shop.