REVIEW: ‘Young Justice,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Young Justice Issue #2

Young Justice #2 is published by DC Comics under the Wonder Comics imprint. It’s written by Brian Michael Bendis, with art from Emanuela Lupacchino and Patrick Gleason, colors from Alejandro Sanchez, inking from Ray McCarthy, and letters from Josh Reed. In the debut issue, the nightmare that is Gem World invades Metropolis and as the team is reunited, they realize that this battle will help them bring back Superboy.

With the Gem World’s hellscape readily apparent, we get to see Amethyst standing her ground against her homeworld and those running it accepting seeing her as an enemy.   Meanwhile, Jinny Hex, Teen Lantern, and Wonder Girl meet each other. The majority of Young Justice #2 is all about Wonder Girl and ultimately her relationship with her grandfather.

Bendis’ writing of their exchange is too wordy and falls flat. The conversation is hard to follow. This may be because I haven’t read Wonder Woman recently which is referenced as a note, but Wonder Girl’s dialogue just doesn’t sound real. I mean, the bulk of the comic is just standing — or floating — around and if it wasn’t for the wonderful art and colors from Lupacchino, Gleason, and Sanchez kept me engaged when the dialogue made me want to stop reading.

The design of the Gem World is amazingly dark in contrast to the bright colors of our character’s clothing. I also feel like the face details are amazing and I love everything visual about the series so far. I got a Robin riding a unicorn, and honestly, I would keep reading just for the art and situations alone.

That being said, it doesn’t make up for the writing. Like most new series, I’m sure we have at least another two issues of introductions and background stories for our new characters and establishing Young Justice as an actual team — which it isn’t yet. I’m patient and will be picking up the next issues, if not only to learn more about Teen Lantern.

Overall, it’s important to remember that Wonder Comics is an imprint from DC aimed at teens and telling their stories. Unfortunately, the wordiness of the interactions makes it difficult to really get behind it at any age level. If you’re looking a good story with good writing, check out other teen comics like Gotham Academy, Teen Titans, or Marvel’s Champions. I know Bendis can write for teens, and he showed us recently in Naomi #1, so I hope it gets better after the team is rounded out.

Young Justice #2 is available in comic book stores now.

Young Justice #2
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TL;DR

Overall, it’s important to remember that Wonder Comics is an imprint from DC aimed at teens and telling their stories. Unfortunately, the wordiness of the interactions makes it difficult to really get behind it at any age level. If you’re looking a good story with good writing, check out other teen comics like Gotham Academy, Teen Titans, or Marvel’s Champions. I know Bendis can write for teens, and he showed us recently in Naomi #1, so I hope it gets better after the team is rounded out.