REVIEW: ‘Batman,’ Issue #64 – The Price of Justice

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Batman Issue #64 - The Price of Justice

Batman #64 is published by DC Comics, written by Joshua Williamson, with art by Guillem March, colors by Tomeu Morey, and letters by Steve Wands. This issue marks the first of four issues of the Batman/Flash crossover series, “The Price of Justice.”

Following the events at Sanctuary in Heroes in Crisis #1, Batman is reeling from the loss of Wally West and grappling with PTSD brought on by the tragedy. Both Batman and the Flash, Barry Allen, have been investigating the death of Wally but have run out of leads. After dealing with another catastrophic Justice League event, the two continue their investigation after an attack on the Flash Museum in Central City while Batman ignores his dangerous flashbacks and hallucinations.

I have been avoiding reading or at this point acknowledging, the Heroes in Crisis event spearheaded by Tom King but unfortunately, it has officially seeped into Batman’s main comic. Opening this book was jarring since the last issue of Batman, albeit penned by King and not Williamson, concluded with Constantine trying to snap Batman out of a dream state.

This issue picks up in a completely different arc with a completely different creative team. I doubled-checked to make sure I had not accidentally skipped an issue of the series. Despite these issues, Batman #64 is a very good comic. The issue ties not only into the events of Heroes in Crisis but also previous threads within Batman arcs of King’s run that have up until now been left to dangle.

Previously, Williamson and King worked together on the Batman/Flash: The Button, one of the few comics in history that has made me openly weep (that’s a good thing)which was a very similar crossover event. I had doubts about the series because of its ties to the Watchmen universe but much like Batman #64, I was very pleasantly surprised.

Batman’s guilt and undiagnosed PTSD is an ongoing theme throughout his comics and present in most of his darker stories. Batman’s darkness is balanced by Flash’s more positive nature. Even in the worst moments, Barry tells Batman they have to keep smiling because there are people to save and they need to know it will be ok.

This dichotomy between the two characters is also seen in March’s art which is better accented by Morey’s colors. Batman’s features are much darker with his face dusted in stubble and clear signs of exhaustion. He is highlighted by heavier line work and shadows. Barry, on the other hand, is cleanly shaven with much brighter features and coloring. 

Overall, Batman #64 – The Price of Justice, is an interesting start to the next chapter in the relationship between Bruce and Barry. I am interested to see what lies ahead for the mini-series but also would like to get back to ongoing Batman “Knightmares” story arc.

I wish this comic had been completely separate from the ongoing Batman comic but I also understand the decision to make it intersect since it ties so heavily with storylines from King’s run. Nonetheless, this is a must-read for Batman and Flash fans alike, and that should mean a lot from someone who so far has been very disappointed in Heroes in Crisis.

Batman #64 is available now in comic book stores everywhere.

Batman #64
5

TL;DR

I wish this comic had been completely separate from the ongoing Batman comic but I also understand the decision to make it intersect since it ties so heavily with storylines from King’s run. Nonetheless, this is a must-read for Batman and Flash fans alike, and that should mean a lot from someone who so far has been very disappointed in Heroes in Crisis.