REVIEW: ‘Batman Beyond,’ Issue #28

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Batman Beyond #28 - But Why Tho?

Batman Beyond #28 is published by DC Comics, written by Dan Jurgens, with art by Brett Booth and Norm Rapmund as penciler and inker respectively, colors from Andrew Dalhouse, letters from Travis Lanham, and main cover art from Pasqual Ferry. As part four of “The Final Joke” arc, we come into the issue with Terry McGinnis and his brother Matt, the new Robin, fighting against the new and improved Joker, well a Joker’ borg.

Although we don’t learn much about the neo-Gothamites other than they like the Joker over the upper-class, we still get a touch of the futurism in the design of the Joker’ borg. The robot changes quickly to adapt to Terry’s fighting style and the way the Joker pilots is ruthless. The art of the interactions between the three is anxiety-inducing. I know, I know, Joker’ borg can’t possibly snap Terry in half but the creative team sure makes you feel like it could happen.

The comic is heavy, to say the least. Jurgens writes the story with one of the hot button topics for Batman fan: kids in battle. With Robins constantly dying or being gravely injured to spur the Bat’s development, the fact that these young men and women are in fact kids makes the topic of Robins a point of fandom debate. It’s no surprise that Terry and Matt’s dad, former Robin, Dick Grayson, is the one who’s biggest fear is highlighted. He’s seen that kids in battle are not able to come out of it unscathed. He’s seen the fate of Jason Todd.

There is a depth to the story in Batman Beyond #28, with the large action panels from Booth and Rapmund, you get a sense of loss and sorrow hanging in the air of the Batcave while Bruce, Dick, and Elianna observe the boys fighting for Gotham and their lives. The art is dynamic due to the illustrations that harken back to the 90’s feel of the series and it is only enhanced by the lettering from Lanham. Dalhouse’s colors also make every piece of the action stick out, with colors popping off the others, specifically the Joker against a bright red Robin.

All of this being said, the best piece of the comic is in the design of the Joker’ borg and it’s coloring. When it comes to machinery and futurism, it can hard to design something that looks alive. And with so many moving parts, individual pistons, and connectors in the borg’s body, it can easily get muddled. But that didn’t happen here. No matter how close up the panel is on the Joker’ borg or how far out, you can clearly distinguish every piece of his metal body, even when it morphs.

It’s also great to see the Joker rearing his maniacal head and making this issue and surely the next, as high stakes as possible. Overall, the story sets up the next part of this arc perfectly. There may be an upcoming death in the family and the spectre of Jason Todd hangs over every page from the start. Terry has been my favorite Batman fa while now, but this series is keeping him in first place. With Batman Beyond having turned 20-years old this year, it’s great to see it keep going, and it’s time for you to pick it up.

Batman Beyond Issue #28 is available wherever comic books are sold now.

Batman Beyond Issue #28
5

TL;DR

It’s also great to see the Joker rearing his maniacal head and making this issue and surely the next, as high stakes as possible. Overall, the story sets up the next part of this arc perfectly. There may be an upcoming death in the family and the spectre of Jason Todd hangs over every page from the start. Terry has been my favorite Batman fa while now, but this series is keeping him in first place. With Batman Beyond having turned 20-years old this year, it’s great to see it keep going, and it’s time for you to pick it up.