REVIEW: ‘Star Trek: The Next Generation: Terra Incognita,’ Issue #6

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Star Trek The Next Generation- Terra Incognita #6 - But Why Tho?

IDW Publishing concludes its science fiction epic, Star Trek The Next Generation: Terra Incognita #6. The series is written by Scott and David Tipton, illustrated by Carlos Nieto, colored by Fran Gamboa and lettered by Neil Uyetake. This is the last of the six-issue limited series.

The end is nigh. The crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise-D under Captain Jean-Luc Picard is under siege by its wicked counterparts from the Mirror Universe. For those accustomed to the television show this series is based on, you will find more action in issue six than you are accustomed to. Having been infiltrated by an evil version of the Federation, the Enterprise is at risk of being subdued by the enemy.

In previous issues, the ship had been accosted and, for most of the series, left completely in the dark about it. Reginald Barkley, a character known for being highly intelligent yet socially awkward, has been replaced. Subdued, and imprisoned in his own quarters by a near-identical Barkley from the Mirror Universe.

Mirror Barkley is much more cunning and has penetrated the veil between dimensions in order to find mighty weapons for his captain, a sinister, and more athletic Captain Jean-Luc Picard. The switch went off without notice. Perhaps that will be a thorn in the side for some who have followed this story, as revelations happen in the final issue as opposed to being unveiled a bit sooner, but for me, it was fine. It read like an episode of Star Trek, where the solution comes in the last five minutes.

I think the basis for any comic book tackling a television series is likeness. In other words, does the writing display the personas of the characters properly? Will the art show the faces to closely resemble the actors onscreen, while allowing the illustrator to input their own personal flair? For me, in Star Trek The Next Generation: Terra Incognita #6, both succeeded.

Each character behaved as I, a Trekkie, fondly remembered. As I re-watch Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG) often, I’m familiar with every officer on the Enterprise, and I like the way the Tiptons handled them. The same goes for the art by Carlos Nieto. Here, faces are important. I had no trouble recognizing Riker, Picard, La Forge, and Data. I also really enjoyed his version of Lt. Worf, who is my personal favorite from TNG. There is a little variation from the original in how the face of Reginald Barkley is drawn, but not too much to cry over.

The colors in the book are right in TNG color scheme, bright uniforms with passive backgrounds reminiscent of the late 80s. Action sequences come in big, comic book strokes that I liked, a surprise as I wouldn’t associate such a bold style with this iteration of Star Trek.

The series ends well, while also leaving room for more possibly down the pike. For those who really love Mirror Universe variants in Trek lore, this addition should be a fine one to your collection. For anyone looking for more Trek material, this series is well done and does honor to the show. Earlier issues offered a fine moment of command and action for Counselor Deanna Troi during a shuttlecraft crash while on a diplomatic mission.

Star Trek The Next Generation: Terra Incognita #6 is a plus for Trekkies, and a solid run for any comics fan who has a foot in science fiction and stories revolving more around characterization and group dynamics rather than slugfests and powers.

Star Trek: The Next Generation: Terra Incognito #6
5

TL;DR

Star Trek The Next Generation: Terra Incognita #6 is a plus for Trekkies, and a solid run for any comics fan who has a foot in science fiction and stories revolving more around characterization and group dynamics rather than slugfests and powers.