REVIEW: ‘Dream Daddy’ Issue #5

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Published by Oni Press and based on the hit dad dating simulator video game from Game Grumps of the same name, Dream Daddy is written by Josh Trujillo, illustrated by D.J. Kirkland, with colors from Matt Herms, and lettered by Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou. Each issue is based on a different self-contained story focused on some of the daddies from Maple Bay. Our cast of dads includes, Craig, Mat, Brian, Robert, Damien, Hugo, and Joseph. Each Dad has a different style, body type, and specialties — with a Dad for everyone to thirst after.

In issue #5, “Dungeons and Daddies” we see Hugo at the helm of a Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) game as the dungeon master (DM). As the final issue in this series we see Hugo set on DMing the best campaign he possibly can, but not every Dad takes it seriously. Not to mention not every dad is taking the game as seriously as Hugo wants or show him up with their D&D knowledge.

This comic was a breath of fresh air in my holiday slump. When I played the game, the attractiveness of the Dads and the story in the graphic novel-style made me forget all of my problems. This issue does that as well.

As a fan of D&D myself, there were jokes that landed not only because they were humorous but also because they were grounded in what happens during a real game. Especially Damien, the one Dad at the table that feels the need to fansplain creatures. I don’t mean that in a bad way either, it’s a very real thing that the most senior D&D player will do to newbies during their campaigns.

In addition to that, I’ve never DMed a game, but Hugo’s frustration with the uncooperative and oblivious Daddies is a look I’ve seen on many a DM’s face in the same situation. Overall this story is one that will resonate with any D&D player in a way well beyond being thirsty for some of the best-drawn Daddies out there. Add in some maniacal moves from Hugo trying at all costs to stick to the story and this book is a winner, especially by hammering home the point that tabletop RPG’s allow you to be anything you want, play how you want, and have fun.

The colors are vibrant and the designs of the costumes when the Dads are in the game are perfect. The close-up panels of the 20-sided-dice  work to transition and highlight the game they’re playing. The art is cheerful and fantastical when in-game and the comic generally just makes me happy.

If you were a fan of the video game or just looking to relax with some Daddies, I highly suggest that you pick up the series. Print copies are available from Oni Press for $10 or for digital download for $2.99.

Dream Daddy #5
5

Tl;DR

If you were a fan of the video game or just looking to relax with some Daddies, I highly suggest that you pick up the series. Print copies are available from Oni Press for $10 or for digital download for $2.99.