REVIEW: ‘Auntie Agatha’s Home for Wayward Rabbits,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Having grown up reading book series like Harry PotterPercy Jackson and the Olympians, and His Dark Materials, I’m always thrilled whenever I find a piece of literature that’s similar to them. Luckily, Auntie Agatha’s Home For Wayward Rabbits #2 has reminded me why I love reading these kinds of books in the first place.

The series, published by Image Comics, is written by Keith Giffin and illustrated by Benjamine Roman. The colors were done by Bryan Valenza, Beyond Colorlab, and Benjamine Roman. To quickly recap chapter one, readers were introduced to Julie, who lives with her aunt Agatha, who takes in wayward rabbits. It also showed the friendship dynamic between Julie and Sawyer, one of the rabbits. Towards the end of the chapter, two mob-like enforcers make their way inside the house and demand Julie to take them to see her aunt.

Auntie Agatha’s Home For Wayward Rabbits #2 picks up where the last one ended. The enforces, whose names as Naomi and Raquel, have found where Agatha lives and make their way to her room. Their mission is to get Agatha to sign over the land she owns, even if they have to force her. Julie is trying to do everything she can to get her aunt out of the house. Meanwhile, Sawyer asks the other rabbits about the newly arrived Japanese exchange rabbit Asuka. He hopes he can convince her to help get rid of the enforcers.

From what I’ve read so far, Auntie Agatha’s Home For Wayward Rabbits #2 reminds me a lot of the Cartoon Network animated show Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends. It has a similar vibe, with the main characters in both series being a human who both befriend magical creatures that live in homes that are specific to them.

Foster’s was definitely an underrated show and I was sad when the show ended in 2009. It had been a while since I was reminded of that show, but the fact that I find both of these series to have similar elements, I knew that I had found another favorite comic book series.

From “Auntie Agatha’s Home for Wayward Rabbits” – Keith Giffen (Writer), Benjamin Roman (Artist and Colorist), Bryan Valenza (Colorist). and Beyond Colorlab (Colorist).

I have to compliment Giffen for creating a world that not only has talking rabbits but that’s genuinely funny. The interactions between Julie and Sawyer show a very realistic relationship between friends. It’s evident that Sawyer would to anything for Julie, which shows just what kind of friend he is.

The rabbits have an established community that’s established well. Everything in this world is introduced at a steady pace that doesn’t make things difficult to understand. Certain fantasy pieces often take themselves a bit too serious and try to establish everything quickly to get to the main story. I also appreciate the subtle political jokes that are included. They aren’t too watered down but also don’t come off as trying to be offensive to the readers.

The drawings and colors are what make this comic pop even more. Each rabbit is drawn different to seemingly represent their personalities. That much dedication to the drawings and colors is amazing to see. The way everything was drawn made me feel like I was watching a television show. I could see all of those characters moving in my head.

Overall, I’m very happy that I was able to read this comic. I’m looking forward to seeing how the story continues. My love for Foster’s has carried over to this comic series. If you’re a fan of the show, fantasy, or just looking for a new comic, I highly recommend you check it out.

Auntie Agatha’s Home for Wayward Rabbits #2 is available now wherever comic books are sold.

 

Auntie Agatha's Home for Wayward Rabbits #2
5

TL;DR

Overall, I’m very happy that I was able to read this comic. I’m looking forward to seeing how the story continues. My love for Foster’s has carried over to this comic series. If you’re a fan of the show, fantasy, or just looking for a new comic, I highly recommend you check it out.