REVIEW: ‘Rainbow Brite,’ Issue #2

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Rainbow Brite #2 is published by Dynamite Comics and written by Jeremy Whitley, with art by Brittney Williams, colors by Valentina Pinto, and lettered by Taylor Esposito. The regular cover was done by Paulina Ganucheau. Previously, in issue #1, Wisp was helping her new friend Twinkle as a mysterious and evil force steals the color from the world.

We pick up as Wisp and Twinkle are being chased by a dark, rabid dog. After utilizing camouflage, the duo is able to escape but quickly find themselves face-to-face with the Shadow King’s scientist, Murky Dismal. With a better understanding of the changing world around her, Wisp sets out to find the white light and restore color and goodness to the world by facing her destiny. Wisp is an incredibly relatable character. Anyone who grew up as a tomboy will see themselves in her spunky style and personality. She radiates innocence and kindness that makes you can’t help but root for her on her journey. She is reluctant to accept power and doubts her own abilities going so far as to even tell Twinkle he will be disappointed in her.

As a woman, I often struggle with imposter syndrome, the idea that your success is due to luck and not your talent or qualifications. Wisp’s inability to see her own beautiful characteristics that make her a strong young girl is sad but also very realistic and relatable. Furthermore, this book challenges the traditionally chosen one narrative and instead reinforces the idea that we choose our own destiny and standing up to evil is more than important than any prophecy. Wisp must save the world not because she has been chosen too, but because she has too.

Despite having a low reading level and being based on a children’s franchise, the comic can be incredibly wordy because of the world building. Prior to this comic, I had very little knowledge of Rainbow Brite. I was a tad too young to grow up watching the show. The long world bubbles and slightly convoluted lore can be overwhelming for new readers.

However, despite the wordy nature of the comic, it is delightful. Whitley writes an incredibly likable Wisp. Additionally, Williams’ art adds a lot of whimsy to the story with its cartoonish design. In a book called Rainbow Brite, color is very important. While a lot of this issue had to rely on grays, the end panels are beautifully colored and drawn. Pinto’s coloring within the last three pages of the book elevates the book entirely. The last pages smartly feature little dialogue and instead focus on Wisp’s expressions and transformation. Overall, I highly recommend this book for someone looking for a lighter read as well as fans of Rainbow Brite both new and old.

Rainbow Brite #2 is available at comic stores and online everywhere.

Rainbow Brite #2
4

TL:DR

Despite the wordy nature of the comic, it is delightful. Whitley writes an incredibly likable Wisp. Additionally, Williams’ art adds a lot of whimsy to the story with its cartoonish design. In a book called Rainbow Brite, color is very important.